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My question is related to this question. I have several bunch of actions that need to be executed from a batch file and I would like to model them as functions and call from a master sequence. From the above question, it is clear that I can do this with the call syntax

call:myDosFunc

My question is that can I place all these functions in a seperate batch file (functions.bat) and somehow 'include' that in the main batch file and call them? Another option would be to utilize the possibility to invoke functions.bat from main.bat with the call syntaxt, but I'm not sure if I can invoke that with a specific function instead of executing the whole batch file.

In short, I'm looking for something similar to the C programming world where my functions reside in a DLL and the main program contains only the high-level logic and calls the functions from the DLL.

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1  
You can do it - but it's not a good solution, it's messy, it leaves your scripts at the mercy of a library and you can get contention with various scripts all trying to use the library at the same time. Thus you would have to program the library to handle concurrent access. IMO experienced batch scripters tend to write self contained scripts and not rely on a single library - but do use several batch files that can be utilities. –  foxidrive Sep 11 '13 at 13:38
    
@foxidrive: Thanks for your feedback. See my last response to DrakaSAN. I'm not in a position to redesign this now. –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 13:56
    
@foxidrive - What programming needs to be done to enable concurrent access?, and how is that any different than concurrent access to a single script that does one thing? –  dbenham Sep 11 '13 at 14:19
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@foxidrive - not often, but yes I have used a library script, and experienced no problems. I agree that the issues you raise are legitemate concerns for batch programming in general, but not specific to building a library of functions. I just think it is important to isolate issues as much as possible and not "muddy the waters". I'll stop now :) –  dbenham Sep 11 '13 at 15:34
1  
@PermanentGuest - regarding your question concerning mutex in batch: see How do you have shared log files under Windows? and Serialize execution of symstore via Powershell or BATCH for examples showing how to serialize events across parallel batch processes –  dbenham Sep 11 '13 at 15:40
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a simple example of how it might be done.

The function script is called with the name of the function as the first argument, and function arguments as arg2, arg3, ...

Assuming it is called properly, the script shifts the arguments and performs GOTO to the original arg1. Then the function has its arguments starting with the new arg1. This means you can take already written routines and plop them in the utility without having to worry about adjusting the parameter numbers.

The script gives an error if the function argument is not supplied, or if the function argument does not match a valid label within the script.

@echo off
if "%~1" neq "" (
  2>nul >nul findstr /rc:"^ *:%~1\>" "%~f0" && (
    shift /1
    goto %1
  ) || (
    >&2 echo ERROR: routine %~1 not found
  )
) else >&2 echo ERROR: missing routine
exit /b

:test1
echo executing :test1
echo arg1 = %1
exit /b

:test2
echo executing :test2
echo arg1 = %1
echo arg2 = %2
exit /b

:test3
echo executing :test3
echo arg1 = %1
echo arg2 = %2
echo arg3 = %3
exit /b

I prefer the GOTO approach that I used above. Another option is to use CALL instead, as Thomas did in his answer.

For a working example of a usefull library of batch functions that uses the CALL technique, see CHARLIB.BAT, a library of routines for processing characters and strings within a batch file. A thread showing development of the library is available here

I wrote CharLib.bat a few years ago. Were I to write it today, I would probably use GOTO instead of CALL.

The problem with introducing a CALL is that it creates issues when passing string literals as parameters. The extra CALL means that a string literal containing % must have the percents doubled an extra time. It also means unquoted poison characters like & and | would need to be escaped an extra time. Those two issues can be addressed by the caller. But the real problem is that each CALL doubles up quoted carets: "^" becomes "^^". There isn't a good way to work around the caret doubling problem.

The problems with the extra CALL don't impact CharLib.bat because string values are passed by reference (variable name) and not as string literals.

The only down side to using GOTO with SHIFT /1 is that you cannot use %0 to get the name of the currently executing routine. I could have used SHIFT without the /1, but then you wouldn't be able to use %~f0 within a routine to get the full path to the executing batch file.

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awsome, dbenham. Thanks for this. I had an idea that this can be done in an ugly way with a series of if-else statements for each function. But this is much clean and the way to go. I didn't know that we could use a parameter in goto. Thanks. –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 14:33
    
Overly complicated see @Thomas's answer. –  Sandeep Datta Oct 3 '13 at 17:57
    
@SandeepDatta - Wow, you and I sure have a different sense of when to down vote. You may think this is overly complicated, but that extra code is providing 2 very useful features: 1) error checking to make sure the "library" is called properly with a valid routine, and 2) the SHIFT operations make it possible to copy existing subroutines verbatim and incorporate them in the library, without having to adjust the parameter numbers. You may think those features are not worthy, but to down vote because they are included is harsh in my book. The Thomas solution using CALL can corrupt parameters. –  dbenham Oct 3 '13 at 21:30
    
I am sorry you feel that way. It was an objective decision. Your solution doesn't work for me. I cant use %* in the subroutine now. However Thomas's solution does work. If I had seen his solution first it could have saved me some time and frustration. You already have >30K reputation a single down vote is not going to hurt you. –  Sandeep Datta Oct 4 '13 at 6:33
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I think a routing function in the beginning of a batch file is not that ugly. You can use something like this at the beginning of a "libbatch.cmd"

    call:%*
    exit/b

:func1
    [do something]
    exit/b

:func2
    [do something else]
    exit/b

Now you can call func2 from another batch with:

call libbatch.cmd func2 params1 param2 ... paramN

this also preserves the errorlevel "thrown" by func2 (exit/b hands over the current errorlevel). With the second call instead of a goto you ensure that "%1"=="param1" and not func2. And call will not terminate the batch file if the label does not exist, it simply sets the errorlevel to 1 and puts an error message to 2 (errorout), which could be redirected to nul.

Explanation: %* contains all parameters, so in the example the first line translates to:

call:func2 params1 param2 ... paramN
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This is getting better. Thanks for this suggestions –  PermanentGuest Sep 12 '13 at 9:29
    
One more thing.. I didn't know that the routing can be done 'dynamically' as given here or in the above answers. This emulates a virtual function call in C++ which is not at all bad. I was always thinking about a series of if-else statements to achieve that. –  PermanentGuest Sep 12 '13 at 9:39
    
Better to use GOTO than CALL because CALL can corrupt parameters: % characters are lost and must be doubled by the caller to compensate. Quoted ^ characters are doubled by the CALL. The ^ doubling is a nasty problem. I'm not aware of a good solution. –  dbenham Oct 3 '13 at 21:37
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You can use this format - and launch it like this:

call mybat :function4 parameternumber2 parameternumber3

this would be one way of using a library

@echo off
goto %1

:function1
REM code here - recursion and subroutines will complicate the library
REM use random names for any temp files, and check if they are in use - else pick a different random name
goto :eof

:function2
REM code here - recursion and subroutines will complicate the library
REM use random names for any temp files, and check if they are in use - else pick a different random name
goto :eof

:function3
REM code here - recursion and subroutines will complicate the library
REM use random names for any temp files, and check if they are in use - else pick a different random name
goto :eof

:function4
REM code here - recursion and subroutines will complicate the library
REM use random names for any temp files, and check if they are in use - else pick a different random name
goto :eof
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Thanks, foxidrive. –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 14:35
1  
I'm sure I won't have any recursive functions ! –  PermanentGuest Sep 12 '13 at 9:00
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You may use an interesting trick that avoids most of the problems that other methods have when they try to make the library functions available to the main program and it is much faster. The only requisites to use this trick are:

  • The library functions must be called from inside a code block in the main file, and
  • In that code block no main file functions are called.

The trick consist in "switch the context" of the running Batch file in a way that the library file becomes the running Batch file; this way, all the functions in the library file becomes available to the main code block with no additional processing. Of course, the "context" of the running Batch file must be switched back to the main file before the code block ends.

The way to "switch the context" is renaming the library file with the same name of the running main file (and renaming the main file to another name). For example:

(
   rem Switch the context to the library file
   ren main.bat orig-main.bat
   ren library.bat main.bat
   rem From this point on, any library function can be called
   . . . .
   rem Switch back the context to the original one
   ren main.bat library.bat
   ren orig-main.bat main.bat
)

EDIT: Working example added

I copied the example below from the screen. Tested in Windows 8, but I also used this method in Win XP:

C:\Users\Antonio\Documents\test
>type main.bat
@echo off
(
   rem Switch the context to the library file
   ren main.bat orig-main.bat
   ren library.bat main.bat
   rem From this point on, any library function can be called, for example:
   echo I am Main, calling libFunc:
   call :libFunc param1
   echo Back in Main
   rem Switch back the context to the original one
   ren main.bat library.bat
   ren orig-main.bat main.bat
)

C:\Users\Antonio\Documents\test
>type library.bat
:libFunc
echo I am libFunc function in library.bat file
echo My parameter: %1
exit /B

C:\Users\Antonio\Documents\test
>main
I am Main, calling libFunc:
I am libFunc function in library.bat file
My parameter: param1
Back in Main
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Are you sure if this works? I tried this and I get a strange error that "The batch file cannot be found" after renaming the main to org-main and I cross-checked the file names and there doesn't seem to be any problem with that. –  PermanentGuest Sep 12 '13 at 9:44
    
See my added example above. Be sure that no other process keep the main.bat or library.bat files opened, like the text editor. –  Aacini Sep 13 '13 at 1:40
    
OK, this works for me. I deleted my example yesterday and I don't now know what was missing in that. Anyway, thank you very much for the answer. Another way to get things done, great.. –  PermanentGuest Sep 13 '13 at 10:11
3  
Stupid 5 minute rule:) This is indeed an interesting approach, but I wouldn't allow that construct in our department. Some reasons are: Code should not be in an area where a user could change it, so renaming is certainly not an option (especially in an multi-user environment). This just transfers the problem of huge batch file to just another batch file, and it seems useless if you work with multiple cmd-libs. As we are talking about batch files, performance is not an issue anyway, which I can't really see here. I see there can be situations where this is useful, but not as a general approach. –  Thomas Sep 17 '13 at 8:21
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Nice trick, but I avoid this as it produces some problems when using this from multiple tasks and when an error occours the renaming will not be reverted. But still nice .. +1 –  jeb Oct 4 '13 at 8:23
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I'm not sure of the context of the original question, but this might be a case where switching to something like WSH with VBScript or WPS, or any other console-capable scripting other than batch files. I will answer the original question, but first.. a little background and understanding..

The command line/console mode of DOS and Windows is usually either COMMAND.COM or CMD.EXE, which isn't well-geared towards scripting/programming logic. Rather, they're geared towards executing commands and programs, and batch files were added to commonly used sequences of commands to wrapped up in a single typed command. For example, you may have an old DOS game you play that needs the following commands every time, so it's packaged as a batch file:

@EHO OFF
@REM Load the VESA driver fix..
VESAFIX.EXE
@REM Load the joystick driver..
JOYSTICK.COM
@REM Now run the game
RUNGAME.EXE

Many people tend to view the entire batch file as one atomic unit--But it's not. The command interpreter (COMMAND.COM or CMD.EXE) will merely act like you manually typed those lines, one by one, each time you run the batch file. It really has no solid concept of lexica and scoping like a regular programming/scripting language would--that is, it doesn't maintain much extra meta-data like a call stack, et cetera. What little it does maintain is more added like it's an afterthought rather than built-in to batch file from the beginning.

Once you shift the gears in your thinking, however, you can often overcome this limitation using various tricks and techniques to emulate more powerful scripting/programming languages; But you still have to remember that batch files are still going to be limited, regardless.

Anyhow, one technique of using a batch file library is to create a batch file where the first parameter is used to indicate which function is being called:

CALL BATLIB.BAT FunctionName Parameter1 Parameter2 ...

This works well enough when the library is written with this in mind, so it'll know to skip the first argument, et cetera.

Using more modern version of CMD.EXE in Windows' systems allows the use of ":labels" in the CALL syntax, which can be useful if you want to limit the parameter scope (which allows you to use %* for "all arguments", for example), like this:

CALL :LABEL Parameter1 Paramater2 ...

(from within the same batch file or ...)

CALL BATLIB.BAT :LABEL Parameter1 Parameter2 ...

A few notes about that, though.. In the first form, the :LABEL must be already within the current batch file. It will create a new "batch context" within CMD.EXE where %*, %1, %2, et cetera are matched to the parameters. But you'll also have to provide some kind of return/exit logic to return/exit from that context back to the calling context.

In the second form, CMD.EXE does not really recognize that you are passing it a label, so your batch file library will have to expect it and handle it:

@ECHO OFF
CALL %*

This works because the command interpreter replaces the %* before it even attempts to parse the CALL command, so after variable expansion, the CALL command would see the :LABEL as if it were hard-coded. This also creates a situation where CMD.EXE creates yet another batch context, so you'll have to make sure to return/exit from that context twice: Once for the current library context, again to get back to the original CALL.

There are still other ways to do a batch file library, mixing and matching the above techniques, or using even more complex logic, using GOTO's, et cetera. This is actually such a complex topic that there are entire sections of books written on the topic, much more than I want to type in a simple answer here!

And so far, I've mostly ignored other issues you will encounter: What if the CALL label does not exist? How will it be handled? What about environment variable expansion? when does it happen? How can you prevent it from happening too soon? What about using special DOS characters in the arguments/parameters? For example, how does the interpreter see a line like: CALL :ProcessPath %PATH%? (The answer to that is that CMD.EXE _replaces the entire %PATH% before_ it even processes the CALL command. This can create issues if your path has spaces in it which can trip up how CALL processes the entire thing, as many Windows' %PATH% variables do.. C:\Program Files.. for example..)

As you can see, things are getting complicated and messy very quickly.. And you have to stop thinking like a programmer and start thinking like COMMAND.COM/CMD.EXE, which pretty much only sees one single line at a time, not the whole batch file as an atomic unit. In fact, here's an example to help you really grasp the way it works..

Create a folder, C:\testing, and put the following batch, file called "oops.bat", in it:

@ECHO OFF
ECHO Look mom, no brain!
PAUSE
ECHO Bye mom!

Now open a console window and run it, but let it sit there at the PAUSE:

C:\testing>oops.bat
Look mom, no brain!
Press any key to continue . . .

While it's sitting at the PAUSE, open oops.bat in your text editor and change it to:

@ECHO OFF
ECHO Look mom, no brain!?
ECHO Oops!
PAUSE
ECHO Bye mom!

Save it, then switch back to your console window and press any key to continue running the batch file:

'ops!' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
Press any key to continue . . .
Bye mom!
c:\testing>

Whoa.. see that error there? That happened because we edited the batch file while it was still being run by CMD.EXE, but our edits changed where in the batch file CMD.COM thought it was. Internally, CMD.EXE maintains a file pointer indicating the start of the next character to process, which in this case would have been the byte right after the line with the PAUSE (and the CRLF) on it. But when we edited it, it changed the location of the next command in the batch file, but CMD.EXE's pointer was still in the same place. In this case, it was pointing to the byte position right in the middle of the "ECHO Oops!" line, so it tried to process "ops!" as a command after the PAUSE.

I hope this makes it clear that COMMAND.COM/CMD.EXE will always see your batch files as a stream of bytes, not as a logical block, subroutines, et cetera, like a script language or compiler would. This is why batch file libraries are so limited. It makes it impossible to "import" a library in to a currently running batch file.

Oh, and I just had another thought.. In modern Windows' CMD.EXE, you can always create a batch file which creates a temporary batch file on the fly, then calls it:

@ECHO OFF
SET TEMPBAT=%TEMP%\TMP%RANDOM:~0,1%%RANDOM:~0,1%%RANDOM:~0,1%%RANDOM:~0,1%.BAT
ECHO @ECHO OFF > %TEMPBAT%
ECHO ECHO Hi Mom! I'm %TEMPBAT%! >> %TEMPBAT%
ECHO Hello, world, I'm %~dpnx0!
CALL %TEMPBAT%
DEL %TEMPBAT%

This effectively creates a temporary batch file in your temporary directory, named TMP####.BAT (where the #'s are replaced by random numbers; The %RANDOM:~0,1% means take the first digit of the number returned by %RANDOM%--we only wanted one single digit here, not the full number that RANDOM returns..), then ECHO's "Hello, World," followed by it's own full name (the %~dpnx0 part), CALLs the temporary batch file, which in turn ECHO's "Hi Mom!" followed by it's own [random] name, then returns to the original batch file so it can do whatever cleanup is needs, such as deleting the temporary batch file in this case.

Anyhow, as you can see by the length of this post, this topic really is not a simple one. There's dozens or more web pages out on the web with tons of batch file tips, tricks, et cetera, many of which go in to depth about how to work with them, create batch file libraries, what to watch out for, how to pass arguments by reference vs. by value, how to manage when and where variables get expanded, and so on.

Do a quick Google search for "BATCH FILE PROGRAMMING" to find many of them, and you can also check out Wiki and WikiBooks, SS64.com, robvanderwoude.com and even DMOZ's http://www.dmoz.org/Computers/Software/Operating_Systems/x86/DOS/Programming/Languages/Batch/ directory with more resources.

Good luck!

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As said Cody Gray in your previous question, you can t.

You must have one file for each "function".

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Unfortunate. Another ugly way is to have a 'routing' function in the functions.bat which takes the function name as parameter and calls the appropriate functions accordingly. But this is a very bad solution :( –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 13:28
    
I m wondering how you can have a lot of bat 'function', isn t batch made for little script? It seems you are trying to code a program in batch, it don t seems to be a good idea. –  DrakaSAN Sep 11 '13 at 13:29
    
Our batch files grow in size and it is already over 3000 lines ! –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 13:44
    
It seems foxidrive know batch better than me. But what are you trying to achieve with a 3k lines batch file? I just don t get the point to make such long script, I m convicted that in that case, you d better use more 'classic' languages, like C, or Java. –  DrakaSAN Sep 11 '13 at 13:50
    
In this example this is just a script to backup a set of files used by a big platform. And we don't have control on it. We have to plugin some 100 or so lines specific to our application to this file and I don't want to scatter these new lines in the original big script. I thought if could isolate my lines (which do various things, hence seperate functions) to a new file and just insert the invocation code in the original file. But, it looks like I will have to go for ugly ways. Thanks very much for your thoughts, though –  PermanentGuest Sep 11 '13 at 13:55
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