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I have a table with a spanned row looking like this:

+----------+---------+
| Spanned  |  Row A  |
| row      |         |
| (several +---------+
| lines of |  Row B  |
| text)    |         |
+----------+---------+

The contents of Row A and B are vertically top-aligned, but the Rows are also distributed evenly vertically to have the same height as the spanned row. I want the result ot be like this instread:

+----------+---------+
| Spanned  |  Row A  |
| row      +---------+
| (several |  Row B  |
| lines of |         |
| text)    |         |
+----------+---------+

That is, I want Row A to be as small as possible and only Row B to expand vertically. Can this be done? I have tried various styling through CSS, including min-height, but the rows always seem to be distributed evenly. In reality, I have more rows than A and B, and I want only the last one to expand vertically beyond the actual contents. I cannot predict the actual amount of content in any of the rows, so explicitly setting the height won't work.

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1  
Please provide your markup and relevant css. People are much more likely to give you concrete answers. –  Serv Sep 11 '13 at 13:17
    
Set height of "Row A" to 20% and "Row B" to 80%. That should work. –  Jack Sep 11 '13 at 13:23
    
Jack, I cannot set the height to eplxicit or relative values, as I simply don't know how much content there is in the rows. I'm looking for some sort of automatic way to do this, regardless of the actual content in the cells. –  Thomas Michanek Sep 11 '13 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

It's a bit hard to answer without your html markup. But the behavior you want seems to be the default one under Chrome.

You need to set a fixed height for your rows, and set the last row to "auto" so it will fill the rest of the height of the table.

For firefox, I used this code:

<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
        table td {
            border: 1px solid black;
            width: 200px;
            vertical-align: top;
        }

        table tr {
            height: 1.2em;
        }

        table tr.last {
            height: auto;
        }

        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <table>
            <tr>
            <td rowspan="2">Several lines of text. Lorem ipsumLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur     adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod
                tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam,
                quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo
                consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse
                cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non
                proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</td>
                <td>Line A</td> 
            </tr>
            <tr class="last">
                <td>Line B</td>
            </tr>
        </table>
    </body>
</html>

Note that you can use a CSS pseudo class instead of the "last" class that I used, depending of what browsers you want to be able to support.

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This is about the best that can be done within the limitations of how table works. –  Marc Audet Sep 11 '13 at 13:51

According to the CSS specification:

CSS 2.1 does not specify how cells that span more than one row affect row height calculations except that the sum of the row heights involved must be great enough to encompass the cell spanning the rows.

Reference: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/tables.html#height-layout

However, you can come close with something like the following.

For example, if you have a 4-row table:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="4">The left stuff...</td>
        <td >Row A and some more text for demo.</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td >Row B</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td >Row C</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="last">Row D</td>
    </tr>
</table>

apply the following CSS:

table {
    border: 1px dotted blue;
    width: 300px;
    table-layout: fixed;
}
td {
    vertical-align: top;
    height: 10px;
}
td.last {
    background-color: beige;
    height: auto;
}

Set a small length value for the td height. The table cells treat height values as minimum value so a small value mimics a shrink-to-fit effect.

For the last (bottom) table cell, set height: auto and this lets the cell expand in height. It is not clear from the CSS specification that this should work and the results may be browser dependent. (I tested in Firefox.)

See demo at: http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/jrCHj/

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Unfortunately, I cannot get it to work in my code. I'll try to upload my code in a separate message. –  Thomas Michanek Sep 11 '13 at 15:06
    
The fiddle works, so there must be something simple that you missed in the style sheets someplace. –  Marc Audet Sep 11 '13 at 15:12
    
I feel really stupid for asking this, but how do I provide the code? If I paste the code and try to apply Code from the "menu" here, I get an error telling me to add 4 spaces to each line ??? –  Thomas Michanek Sep 11 '13 at 15:17
    
You need to indent all code lines by 4 spaces to get it to look right. Best to update your original post instead of posting as a comment. –  Marc Audet Sep 11 '13 at 15:19
    
I tried to update the original post. I'm sorry, but I really cannot sit and manually add 4 spaces to each line. There surely must be a simpler way? –  Thomas Michanek Sep 11 '13 at 15:24

Try set <td style="height:1%"> for all cells except the last one in the second column. For me working perfectly, at least in Firefox.

http://jsfiddle.net/Sy6vH/

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If you try this out on a table, you will see that it does not work as you expect. –  Marc Audet Sep 11 '13 at 13:41

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