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I have a MySQL commands:

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS courses;

USE courses

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS teachers(
    id INT(10) UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    name VAR_CHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    addr VAR_CHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    phone INT NOT NULL,
);

When I run it, I get an error:

ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the
manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right
syntax to use near 'VAR_CHAR(50) NOT NULL, addr VAR_CHAR(255) NOT
NULL, phone INT NOT NULL, )' at line 3
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it's VARCHAR not VAR_CHAR! –  John Woo Sep 11 '13 at 13:26
    
Thank you! Just a simple error ) –  SkyStar Sep 11 '13 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is varchar and not var_char

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS courses;

USE courses;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS teachers(
    id INT(10) UNSIGNED PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    addr VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    phone INT NOT NULL
);

You should use a SQL tool to visualize possbile errors like MySQL Workbench.

share|improve this answer
    
Won't work, look at phone, you got extra comma there. –  N.B. Sep 11 '13 at 13:27
1  
What is wrong with "use databasename"? –  Borniet Sep 11 '13 at 13:30

Try this:

Use back-ticks for NAME

CREATE TABLE `teachers` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `addr` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `phone` int(10) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8
share|improve this answer

As someone said before it has to be VARCHAR not VAR_CHAR.

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3  
Then why answer ? –  X.L.Ant Sep 11 '13 at 13:28
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  valex Sep 11 '13 at 13:45

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