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I want to validate following text using regular expressions

integer(1..any)/'fs' or 'sf'/ + or - /integer(1..any)/(h) or (m) or (d)

samples :

1) 8fs+60h
2) 10sf-30m
3) 2fs+3h
3) 15sf-20m

i tried with this

function checkRegx(str,id){
    var arr = strSplit(str);
    var regx_FS =/\wFS\w|\d{0,9}\d[hmd]/gi;

    for (var i in arr){
            var str_ = arr[i];
            console.log(str_);
            var is_ok = str_.match(regx_FS);
            var err_pos = str_.search(regx_FS);                
            if(is_ok){
              console.log(' ID from ok ' + id);
              $('#'+id).text('Format Error');
              break;
            }else{
              console.log(' ID from fail ' + id);
              $('#'+id).text('');
            } 
     }  
 }            

but it is not working

please can any one help me to make this correct

share|improve this question
2  
It is difficult to understand what you want the regular expression to match. Perhaps a plain word explanation along with some examples of matching input might help. –  Tibos Sep 11 '13 at 13:30
    
I always use this site for matching up regex for a start txt2re.com/index-php.php3 –  Zesar Sep 11 '13 at 13:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should do it:

/^[1-9]\d*(?:fs|sf)[-+][1-9]\d*[hmd]$/i

You were close, but you seem to be missing some basic regex comprehension.

First of all, the ^ and $ just make sure you're matching the entire string. Otherwise any junk before or after will count as valid.

The formation [1-9]\d* allows for any integer from 1 upwards (and any number of digits long).

(?:fs|sf) is an alternation (the ?: is to make the group non-capturing) to allow for both options.

[-+] and [hmd] are character classes allowing to match any one of the characters in there.

That final i allows the letters to be lowercase or uppercase.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks you so much this is working –  user2768851 Sep 12 '13 at 8:25

I don't see how the expression you tried relates anyhow to the description you gave us. What you want is

/\d+(fs|sf)[+-]\d+[hmd]/

Since you seem to know a bit about regular expressions I won't give a step-by-step explanation :-)

If you need exclude zero from the "integer" matches, use [1-9]\d* instead. Not sure whether by "(1..any)" you meant the number of digits or the number itself.

Looking on the code, you

function checkRegx(str, id) {
    var arr = strSplit(str);
    var regx_FS = /^\d+(fs|sf)[+-]\d+[hmd]$/i;

    for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        var str = arr[i];
        console.log(str);
        if (regx_FS.test(str) {
            console.log(' ID from ok ' + id);
            $('#'+id).text('Format Error');
            break;
        } else {
            console.log(' ID from fail ' + id);
            $('#'+id).text('');
        } 
    }  
}

Btw, it would be better to separate the validation (regex, array split, iteration) from the output (id, jQuery, logs) into two functions.

share|improve this answer
    
this is working thans you so much –  user2768851 Sep 12 '13 at 8:24

Try something like this:

/^\d+(?:fs|sf)[-+]\d+[hmd]$/i
share|improve this answer
1  
Please notice the difference between character classes and (capturing) groups! Btw, your "integer" does not match the 60 from the example –  Bergi Sep 11 '13 at 13:36
    
I edited my code. –  Scalpweb Sep 11 '13 at 13:38
    
looks quite similar to Bergi's answer now –  Jan Dvorak Sep 11 '13 at 13:39
    
True, haven't seen it sorry. Should I delete my post ? –  Scalpweb Sep 11 '13 at 13:39
1  
@Scalpweb There's not necessarily a reason to delete your answer if you independently came to the same answer as another answer. There are some potentially meaningful differences between the answers anyway. –  ajp15243 Sep 11 '13 at 13:54

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