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I have an arraylist of objects, where one of the instance variables in the object is string. I would like to convert the string variables in the object list into a single comma-separated string.

For example,

I have an object employee as below.

public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int age;
}

Consider a list of employees,

List<Employee> empList = new ArrayList<Employee>
Employee emp1 = new Employee ("Emp 1",25);
Employee emp2 = new Employee ("Emp 2",25);
empList.add(emp1);
empList.add(emp2);

Expected output (Type : String):

Emp 1,Emp 2

I know it can be done through looping. But I'm looking for some sophisticated ways to do it and keep the code simpler.

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1  
Do the looping. There is no magical "do what I think I would want you to do" function... –  ppeterka Sep 11 '13 at 13:48
3  
The sophisticated way will contain a loop in it somewhere. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 11 '13 at 13:48
    
Hide your loop behind a function –  YMomb Sep 11 '13 at 13:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Override the toString() method in the Employee class

public String toString() {
   return name;
}

Then, print the list:

String listToString = empList.toString();
System.out.println(listToString.substring(1, listToString.length() - 1));

This is not that sophisticated way to print it, but I doesn't involve the usage of third-party libraries.

If you'd like to use third party libraries, here are several way you can print the list.

// Using Guava
String guavaVersion = Joiner.on(", ").join(items);

// Using Commons / Lang
String commonsLangVersion = StringUtils.join(items, ", ");
share|improve this answer
    
... and there is the loop. OP wants it without that. (even though that is not possible...) –  ppeterka Sep 11 '13 at 13:49
2  
OCD comment: you will have an extra ,. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 11 '13 at 13:50
    
Fixed it. Now it should be fine, although the approach is not my favourite. –  kocko Sep 11 '13 at 13:55
    
Do not need duplicates in final output.. Any way to do that ? –  prabu Sep 11 '13 at 14:03
    
Then you should change the structure to some implementation of the Set interface, because it doesn't allow duplicates. –  kocko Sep 11 '13 at 14:04

Without loop ,Using list.toString()

public class Employee {

     public Employee(String string, int i) {
        this.age=i;
        this.name=string;
    }
    private String name;
     private int age;

     @Override
     public String toString() {
           return name + " " + age;
        }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       List<Employee> empList = new ArrayList<Employee>();
         Employee emp1 = new Employee ("Emp 1",25);
         Employee emp2 = new Employee ("Emp 2",25);
         empList.add(emp1);
         empList.add(emp2);
         System.out.println(empList.toString().
                       substring(1,empList.toString().length()-1));
}
}

Prints

Emp 1 25, Emp 2 25
share|improve this answer
    
He didn't want the age btw... –  Jonathan Drapeau Sep 11 '13 at 13:58
    
@JonathanDrapeau It is mock code,OP can remove/add as per his requirments :) –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Sep 11 '13 at 14:00

I would like to convert the string variables in the object list in to a single comma separated string.

  • implement your own toString():

    public String toString() { return name; }
    
  • call method toString() on your java.util.List:

    empList.toString();
    
  • get rid of '[' and ']':

    String s = empList.toString();
    s = s.substring(1, s.length()-1);
    
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This will add fluff like square brackets around the output, and can change (even though that is quite unlikely) –  ppeterka Sep 11 '13 at 13:50
    
@PatriciaShanahan that is true. But it still ties the whole stuff to one implementation of List.toString(). Not reusable code is not good code. –  ppeterka Sep 11 '13 at 13:56

If you want a real clean way to do this, use function literals in Java 8. Otherwise,

In Employee class:

public String toString() { return name; }

Print out the list, removing the square brackets

list.toString().replaceAll("\\[(.*)\\]", "$1");

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