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I would like to create a 2 column list.

-----------------------------------
price         1.5
-----------------------------------
description   Some text about the
              product written here
              and will expand the 
              height of this column
-----------------------------------
availability  Yes
-----------------------------------
Feature       Some feature about
              the product 
-----------------------------------

I'm using a list with span tag inside each li to make the information inline. But the problem is when the information gets longer like in the case of description and feature, the column height does not grow and thus text on second row is hidden.

So how do I make the left hand side column same height as the right hand column depending on the amount of text written ?

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6  
They're called "tables". That's what they're for. –  cletus Dec 9 '09 at 15:04
    
I wouldn't consider a list of key-value pairs as tabular data. In a table, you have one key and multiple values as rows, not as columns. –  BalusC Dec 9 '09 at 15:13
1  
I dont agree here. The only difference is on which axis the labels are displayed in order to accommodate a "table of items' properties" or a "table of item properties" - id consider both tabular data. Semantically speaking it is surely just as valid to use a definition list but i dont see any semantic advantage of one ovr the other while the table has definite display/markup advantages. –  prodigitalson Dec 9 '09 at 15:23
1  
It's clearly not tabular data; that's where you need two labels to describe one piece of data. In this case there's only one label needed, so it's just a key-value pair. See also: every morsel of modern web design wisdom. –  Robert Grant Dec 9 '09 at 15:51
2  
I think this would be a table. This is tabular data, arranged on a horizontal axis. If you flip the table 90 degrees counter-clockwise and add more data, it's a table. –  tahdhaze09 Dec 9 '09 at 16:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As the comment from Cletus on your question says... use a table. There is a valid use for tables, and if this isnt one then nothing is - display of this type of data is the exact reason they were implemented.

<style type="text/css">
  table.product td, table.product th {vertical-align: top; padding: 5px;}
</style>
<table class="product" cellspacing="0" border="0" width="250">
<tr>
  <th>price</th>
  <td>1.5</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <th>description</th>
  <td>Some text about the product written here and will expand the height of this column</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <th>availability</th><td>yes</td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <th>Feature</th>
  <td>Some feature about the product</td>
</tr>
</table>
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1  
Tables are what you need ... it's called tabular data for a reason. –  Jonny Haynes Dec 9 '09 at 15:20
    
Look how ugly and non-semantic this is. The headers aren't grouped in a <thead> and the body isn't separated into a <tbody>. –  BalusC Dec 9 '09 at 15:21
1  
That is true, it's not the best formatted table. But it's more in the right direction. Don't think you'd need the <thead> property ... definitely needs a <caption> and a <tbody> though –  Jonny Haynes Dec 9 '09 at 15:29
    
yeah i could have added caption and tbody - probably should have that i'll admit. but as far as thead and by extension tfoot they arent needed because the data structure isnt that complex. –  prodigitalson Dec 9 '09 at 15:37
    
I agree with that! –  Jonny Haynes Dec 9 '09 at 15:39

This argument is getting a little daft... Nobody seems to be suggesting that tables are used for layout without semantic meaning, only that the example data provided is tabular and therefore should be displayed in a table. So I can't see the point of posting links about table layout when it is clear that everyone taking part in this debate moved past that years ago.

As BalusC says, the data could quite correctly be displayed in a definition list. It certainly produces more elegant markup, but whether it is more semantically correct is (obviously, from this discussion) debatable. I know of no definition of tabular data that precludes this use, including the OED! Thus using a table for this data is, as prodigitalson says, also fully valid.

Robert Grant - could you provide a link that defines a table as data that requires two labels to identify it? I'm not aware of this definition, but I am willing to learn. I am a little confused as to how using spans in a div is more semantically valid than a table though. Or how it is in any way semantic. Both are meaningless tags.

The markup used must establish the relationship between the key-value pairs. Only a table or dl can do this.

The example markup for the table is pretty sound (as there is no need for a thead btw, the tbody tag is not really necessary as there are no other elements of the table to differentiate). A scope="row" on the tags is necessary for screen readers though, in addition to the caption.

Having said all this, the whole point here is to help someone solve a problem. The nature of that problem would tend to indicate that garj is not an advanced front end developer and that their css skills may not be at the highest standard yet. To me, this means that using a tabular solution is preferable. Styling a dl in a way which degrades gracefully in any browser with a substantial market share is not a trivial task by any means.

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1  
Well said that man! –  Jonny Haynes Dec 10 '09 at 8:08
    
I'd be curious to know what you'd define as "tabular data". And not "well, it's data that I put in a table". –  Robert Grant Dec 10 '09 at 14:02
    
E.g. webdesignfromscratch.com/html-css/html-tables.php : HTML tables should only be used for rendering data that belongs naturally in a grid, in other words where the data describe a number of objects that have the same properties. –  Robert Grant Dec 10 '09 at 14:05
    
And while divs/spans may not be any more semantically correct than a table, they are technically cheaper to render, and infinitely more flexible when it comes to restyling. –  Robert Grant Dec 10 '09 at 14:09
    
It takes more effort to style anything other than a table to look like a table –  Jonny Haynes Dec 10 '09 at 14:13

This will function better than a <dl>, but is not as semantically correct as a <table>.

<ul>
    <li>
    	<h2>Price</h2>
    	<p>1.5</p>
    </li>
    <li>
    	<h2>Description</h2>
    	<p>Some text about the product written here and will expand the  height of this column</p>
    </li>
    <li>
    	<h2>Availability</h2>
    	<p>Yes</p>
    </li>
    <li>
    	<h2>Feature</h2>
    	<p>Some feature about the product</p>
    </li>
</ul>

This is better that a <dl> because the <li> acts as a wrapper, and will hold the <p> content. If you use the <dl> there is no wrapper around the seperate <dt> and <dd>s.

And when the <p> expands it won't crash into next <li>

The CSS:

li {
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 500px; /* or however wide it needs to be */
    }

li h2 {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    }		

li p {
    float: right;
    width: 350px;
    }
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1  
Wow, simply wow (express of astonishment). –  BalusC Dec 9 '09 at 16:58
    
what you astonished by? –  Jonny Haynes Dec 10 '09 at 8:14
1  
My guess is the lengths that semantic HTML zealots will go to to avoid using tables for tabular data. –  cletus Dec 10 '09 at 10:51
    
But I'm not one of those ... I've spent forever arguing that it should be a table. I'm just merely pointing out that my answer would be a better solution (cross browser), than a <dl> –  Jonny Haynes Dec 10 '09 at 11:11
1  
Because you literally commented me "Why use a <dl> and style it to look like a table?" and now you're doing exactly the same (and semantically much more worse) with an <ul>. Impressive. –  BalusC Dec 10 '09 at 13:54

Here'd be my stab at it. Tested in Firefox 3 and IE7, so YMMV, but at least it'll degrade nicely.

<html>
<head>
	<style type="text/css">
	  #items {
		width: 300px;
		border-top:1px solid gray;
	  }

	  #items div {
		clear: left;
		overflow:hidden;
		padding: 5px 0;
		border-bottom:1px solid gray;
	  }

	  .key  {
		width:100px;
		float:left;
	  }

	  .value  {
		width:200px;
		float:left;
	  }
	</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div id="items">
    <div>
      <span class="key">price</span>
      <span class="value">1.5</span>
    </div>
    <div>
		<span class="key">description</span>
		<span class="value">Some text about the product written here 
        and will expand the height of this column</span>
    </div>
    <div>
		<span class="key">availability</span>
		<span class="value">Yes</span>
    </div>
    <div>
		<span class="key">Feature</span>
		<span class="value">Some feature about the product</span>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

See also:

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1  
The links you've provided refer to the layout of the whole page ... you should still use a table for TABULAR data in the content are of an HTML page. That's a really newbie comment ... but judging by your score you're not a newbie?? –  Jonny Haynes Dec 9 '09 at 16:18
2  
I agree with Jonny. You and Balus' argument for a DL is completely valid. However, the links you posted regarding tables for layout are completely irrelevant because no one is trying use a table for layout. The argument is over whether a DL or a Table is semantically more correct, not whether we sould be creating a multi-column layout or something else in a table or what have you. Moreover your posted solution in my opintion is worse than either the dl or the table because you are relying on class attributes to provide the semantic context instead of the element itself... –  prodigitalson Dec 9 '09 at 16:25
    
It's hard to know how many more times we can emphasise that tabular content is data that requires two labels to identify it without starting to sound patronising. What about that statement is confusing? –  Robert Grant Dec 9 '09 at 16:25
2  
Which, if there is no element to accurately provide that context is fine - but in this case there are two potential choices - TABLE and DL so really youre reinventing the wheel with no gained benefits. –  prodigitalson Dec 9 '09 at 16:26
2  
@robert: context meaning that in your example you are relying soley on the call attribute to provide the context for "key" and "value" insead of a th+td OR dt+dd - thus IMHO your solution (and Tyler's below) worse than table. If you want to say its not Tabular data ok - then push use of a DL but it makes no sense to use a DIV>SPAN|SPAN when you can use a DL strcture. –  prodigitalson Dec 9 '09 at 16:36

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