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It is the first time that i use pyhton to create a graphical interface and i have difficulties to understand the link between the parent and the children.

I first create the root window in a separated thread :

import tkinter as tk
import threading as th

class GUI(th.Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        th.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.root = tk.Tk()
        self.gp = MainFrame(self.root)

    def start(self):
        self.root.mainloop()

    def stop(self):
        self.root.destroy()

The constructor of this class calls the constructor of the main frame :

class MainFrame(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.x=my_label(self)
        self.up=my_update(self)
        self.grid()

In this main frame, I have only two simple elements, their class is :

class my_label(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.l = tk.Label(self,text="some text")
        self.l.grid()
        self.grid()

class my_update(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)

        self.b=tk.Button(self,text="update",command=self.ButtonPushed)
        self.b.grid()
        self.grid()

    def ButtonPushed(self):
        # here is my problem...

Doing this works, but when I click on the update button I want to modify x (in the MainFrame). In other words, I want to modify, from a child, one of the other parent's children... how can i do that ?

Side question : does the general construction of my graphical interface seem correct ? I mean, is it correct to let my_update and my_label inherit from tk.Frame ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try following: (See comment to see what I modified.)

class MainFrame(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.x=my_label(self)
        self.up=my_update(self, self.x) # <-- pass another child to constructor
        self.grid()

class my_label(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.l = tk.Label(self,text="some text")
        self.l.grid()
        self.grid()

    # my_update.ButtonPushed will call this method.
    def ButtonPushed(self):
        self.l['text'] = 'pushed'

class my_update(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent, friend):
        #                     ^^^^^^
        # accept another child reference as `freind` as save it as self.friend
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.friend = friend # <-- save reference to another child

        self.b=tk.Button(self,text="update",command=self.ButtonPushed)
        self.b.grid()
        self.grid()

    def ButtonPushed(self):
        self.friend.ButtonPushed() # <-- call another child's method freely.
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thanks, your method works. but while i was reading your answer i realized that the conception of my program was incorrect... so i won't need your solution. you helped me anyway by showing me that my i could find a better way to code ! –  PinkFloyd Sep 16 '13 at 12:53

For your side question: I'm not sure what else your application needs to do, so maybe there's a good reason, but it seems to me that wrapping the label and the button in an extra class that inherits from Frame over complicates things a bit. I think I'd just do:

class MainFrame(tk.Frame):
    def __init__(self,parent):
        tk.Frame.__init__(self,parent)
        self.x=tk.Label(self, text="some text")
        self.up=tk.Button(self, text="update", command=self.ButtonPushed)
        self.x.grid()
        self.up.grid()
        self.grid()

    def ButtonPushed(self):
        # do something with self.x

Or if you really need the extra classes, why not have the child classes inherit from tk.Label and tk.Button. No real need to wrap them in an extra frame.

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