Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My C++ IDE is Visual Studio 2012 Express Version, and my Python IDE is Aptana3 (64-bit). My computer is Windows 7 64-bits.

I've write a .dll with C++ (Win32 console application), which basically follows the instruction at MSDN. It works well when I call it with a C++ application.

Then I try to call it from Python by following codes:

import ctypes

d = ctypes.WinDLL("C:\\DynamicLibrary\\Debug\\MathFuncsDll.dll")

However, I've got following error:

File "`<pyshell#8>`", line 1, in <module>
d = ctypes.WinDLL("C:\\DynamicLibrary\\Debug\\MathFuncsDll.dll")
  File "C:\Python27\lib\ctypes\__init__.py", line 365, in __init__
    self._handle = _dlopen(self._name, mode)
WindowsError: [Error 193] %1 is not a valid Win32 application

I've googled about this error message, and some posts say it because the compatibility between 32- and 64-bits. But I doubt it, since my IDE's and system are all 64-bit.

May I know what am I wrong?

Many thanks in advance. :)

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered using IronPython? – inspectorG4dget Sep 11 '13 at 16:15
    
@Inspector What of it? How do you link to native DLLs from IronPython? – David Heffernan Sep 11 '13 at 16:17
    
import clr; clr.AddReference(…) – inspectorG4dget Sep 11 '13 at 16:18
1  
@inspectorG4dget: If there is a bitness mismatch of native code, using IronPython would not solve the issue – Abhijit Sep 11 '13 at 16:20
    
@Inspector clr.AddReference is for managed DLLs. This one is native. – David Heffernan Sep 11 '13 at 16:25

The most common explanation for that error is that the system is attempting to load a 32 bit DLL into a 64 bit process, or vice versa. The fact that your system is 64 bit just makes that diagnosis more likely. Perhaps your Python is 64 bit, but the C++ project outputs a 32 bit DLL. Or vice versa.

In the question you state that your Python installation is 64 bits. In which case you need to look at your C++ project. What platform are you targetting? Win32 or x64? My money is on the answer to that question being that you target Win32.

That's the most likely explanation. Beyond that the next most likely cause is the exact same problem, but for one of the dependencies. The Python process and the DLL match, but when resolving the dependencies of the DLL the loader finds a DLL of the wrong bitness.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer to the question. Can you please amplify by adding how OP can determine the bitness of the dll and the Python Installation using dumpbin \headers and look for the entry for machine? – Abhijit Sep 11 '13 at 16:19
    
@Abhijit That's not how I would do it. The asker is compiling the DLL and so merely needs to check the target platform in the IDE. No need for reverse engineering. – David Heffernan Sep 11 '13 at 16:24
    
May be, but when in doubt, I first check if there is a bitness mismatch. This is helpful, when using a third party dll. Any case, I have added my own answer – Abhijit Sep 11 '13 at 16:30
    
This may help: 64-bit C++ Development Under Visual Studio 2012 Express – eryksun Sep 11 '13 at 21:17
    
@DavidHeffernan Hi, David, Thanks for you answer. I am targetting to a Win 64 platform. My plan is to write a serie of C++ .dlls and call them from Python. – ChangeMyName Sep 17 '13 at 12:27

I've googled about this error message, and some posts say it because the compatibility between 32- and 64-bits. But I doubt it, since my IDE's and system are all 64-bit.

Yes, your research is correct.

My C++ IDE is Visual Studio 2012 Express Version, My computer is Windows 7 64-bits.

That doesn't guarantee that you would build a 64 bit binary. Infact, VS 2012 IDE is a 32 bit application. Its the compiler and the CRT which is responsible to generate a 64 bit binary. And moreover the default settings for Visual Studio is to generate a 32 bit binary

You can easily google and determine how to build a 64 bit binary using Visual Studio. Alternatively, refer the link How to: Configure Visual C++ Projects to Target 64-Bit Platforms

and my Python IDE is Aptana3 (64-bit). My computer is Windows 7 64-bits.

That still doesn't say anything about your Bitness of your Python Installation .

When in doubt, check for the bitness of your dll and your python.exe. You can easily determine the bitness using dumpbin

C:\Python27>dumpbin /headers python.exe|grep "machine"
             14C machine (x86)
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried to change VS2012 to Win32 in Configuration Manager, however, still get the same error. – ChangeMyName Sep 17 '13 at 12:36

Build your C code to X64 version

I tested it and actually works well

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.