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I have a utility function that wraps console.log with a condition, so we only call console.log if we're in the dev environment and console.log exists:

/* Console log if environment has debug true or #debug initially passed in URL */
metro.conlog = (function () {
    return function (message) {
        if ((metro.siteData.debug || metro.hashOptions.hasOwnProperty('debug')) && window.console && message) {
            console.log(message);
        }
    };
}());

This has worked very well for normal console logs. But I've recently discovered the joys of passing more than one argument to console.log: it allows you to prefix a console log with a string, so console.log('DEBUG', object) outputs the string plus an expandable object whose properties you can inspect. How can I change my conlog function to do this? I've tried logging out all arguments like this:

metro.conlog = (function () {
    return function (message) {
        if ((metro.siteData.debug || metro.hashOptions.hasOwnProperty('debug')) && window.console && message) {
            console.log(arguments);
        }
    };
}());

But this outputs the arguments as an array, instead of the neat line you get with console.log. You can see the difference in this screenshot:

enter image description here

Can anybody tell me how I can reproduce the original log output?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Of course you can do it, this is demo how to do exactly what you need with extra options has added.

And the code is below:

var mylog = (function () {
    return {
        log: function() {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
            console.log.apply(console, args);
        },
        warn: function() {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
            console.warn.apply(console, args);
        },
        error: function() {
            var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
            console.error.apply(console, args);
        }
    }
}());

var name = "Alex";
var arr = [1, 2, 3];
var obj = { a:1, b:2, c:3 };
var hello = function(msg){alert(msg);};
mylog.log("Name: ", name);
mylog.log("Window Debug: ", window);
mylog.error("Something error happen");
mylog.warn("Ahh... Warning", arr, obj);
mylog.log("more parameter: ", arr, obj, hello);
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Thanks a lot Idham, nice solution! –  And Finally Sep 16 '14 at 13:00

Try something like this

/* Console log if environment has debug true or #debug initially passed in URL */
metro.conlog = (function () {
    return function (message, object) {
        if ((metro.siteData.debug || metro.hashOptions.hasOwnProperty('debug')) && window.console && message) {
            console.log(message, object);
        }
    };
}());

where message is something like "DEBUG" and object is whatever object you want to examine.

If you want to be able to pass an arbitrary number of arguments into console.log, I would suggest using the arguments variable.

/* Console log if environment has debug true or #debug initially passed in URL */
    metro.conlog = (function () {
        return function (message, object) {
            if ((metro.siteData.debug || metro.hashOptions.hasOwnProperty('debug')) && window.console && message) {
                console.log(arguments);
            }
        };
    }());

As mentioned in my comments, I am unsure which browsers fully support this (I'm looking at you IE).

I have tested and confirmed that it works in current Chrome, FireFox and Safari.

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Thanks Justin - but would this solution work if I passed metro.conlog('foo') and metro.conlog('foo', myObject, anotherObject, 'bar'), as I can do with the real console log? –  And Finally Sep 13 '13 at 8:40
    
If you want to use it like that. you can just use console.log(arguments); and that will place all arguments that you gave your function. I am unsure on the browser compatibility for that. I know it works in chrome, firefox and safari. I will make an edit to my answer. –  Justin Wood Sep 13 '13 at 14:44
    
you want to use console.log.apply(console, arguments) –  hagbard Sep 13 '13 at 15:10
    
Justin, I did try console.log(arguments), but it didn't give me the same results as the normal console.log. hagbard, that's exactly the answer I needed, thank you! You wanna post it as an answer? –  And Finally Sep 13 '13 at 17:23

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