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tl;dr; - final update with current solution/workaround at the bottom of this post (it is a GoDaddy problem and there is a workaround until they fix it)

I have a mail server that I'm attempting to send mail through from my Java app. I can sent on port 25 successfully so I know code works and all, but 25 is not encrypted session. I need to use TLS on port 587 which requires an SSL cert. I have a valid SSL Cert on the server that is signed by GoDaddy G2 CA and has been in place for a while now (no problems).

My issue, is I'm getting the famed PKIX path building failed: sun.security.provider.certpath.SunCertPathBuilderException: unable to find valid certification path to requested target error message when trying to connect and send mail on 587.

From my understanding of many SO links as well as normal google-fu, this is usually caused when Java doesn't trust the cert or CA -- as is common for a self-signed cert. I've used several of the online SSL Cert checkers to make sure the chain is valid, etc. All appears to be normal... but java will not use the cert automatically.

I am aware there is a class file somewhere from Sun that will download and setup the cert in the local keystore so java will trust it... but this is not only impractical for an app that will be deployed to multiple systems, but is just silly for a Godaddy signed cert.

What's going on? How can I make java use the valid cert on the server without having to make java accept all certs?

EDIT: I just looked in my windows Java Control Panel (default install of jdk 7) and sure enough, under Signer CA the Issued By: The Go Daddy Group, Inc. Go Daddy Class 2 Certification Authority is listed... so what gives? My cert is a Godaddy cert...

UPDATE --

Here's the cert chain as-seen from openssl command recommended in comments:

~]# openssl s_client -connect smtp.somecompany.com:587 -starttls smtp
CONNECTED(00000003)
depth=2 C = US, ST = Arizona, L = Scottsdale, O = "GoDaddy.com, Inc.", CN = Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
verify error:num=19:self signed certificate in certificate chain
verify return:0
---
Certificate chain
 0 s:/OU=Domain Control Validated/CN=smtp.somecompany.com
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
 1 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
 2 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
 3 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
---

Looks ok to me I think...

UPDATE 2 --

Ok, thanks to @Bruno I was able to determine my chain was messed up -- I re-keyed the server and now my chain appears as such:

 ~]# openssl s_client -connect smtp.somecompany.com:587 -starttls smtp
CONNECTED(00000003)
depth=2 C = US, ST = Arizona, L = Scottsdale, O = "GoDaddy.com, Inc.", CN = Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
verify error:num=19:self signed certificate in certificate chain
verify return:0
---
Certificate chain
 0 s:/OU=Domain Control Validated/CN=smtp.somecompany.com
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
 1 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
 2 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
---

Which looks better than before. -- Java still throws the same exception about the cert path, etc. So it appears that the G2 cert chain is not, by default, trusted yet in java 7's default keystore.

FINAL UPDATE FOR COMPLETENESS @ 1/14/2014

Just as an update - This is indeed a GoDaddy problem (I've had lengthy support emails with them). They have 2 CA servers, one called Class 2 CA and the other called G2 CA. Their Class 2 CA signs all SHA-1 certificates, while the G2 CA signs all their SHA-2 certificates. This is where the problem lies - GoDaddy has not added their newer G2 CA server to the default java truststore - causing default java installations to not trust it's authority, and hence, does not trust your chained certificate. The work-around until GoDaddy adds the G2 CA server to the default truststore is to simply rekey your cert using SHA-1 as-to get a cert signed by the Class 2 CA server. Rekeying is free for GoDaddy customers until your cert expires (obviously).

share|improve this question
    
Do you control the server? What is its certificate chain? You can see this with openssl -connect the.server.name:587 -starttls smtp. –  Bruno Sep 11 '13 at 18:38
    
i do control the server, it's here in our office. its out public-facing email server (zimbra). it's signed by godaddy's G2 CA, which uses a chain (chain is installed on the server and the various ssl verification tools online say the chain is valid). –  SnakeDoc Sep 11 '13 at 19:04
    
@Bruno - your openssl command won't work for me. says no command -connect. i tried ssh also... –  SnakeDoc Sep 11 '13 at 19:06
    
Sorry, I meant openssl s_client -connect the.server.name:587 -starttls smtp. –  Bruno Sep 11 '13 at 20:09
5  
Just as an update - This is indeed a GoDaddy problem. They have 2 CA servers, one called Class 2 CA and the other called G2 CA. Their Class 2 CA signs all SHA-1 certificates, while the G2 CA signs all their SHA-2 certificates. This is where the problem lies - GoDaddy has not added their newer G2 CA server to the default java truststore - causing default java installations to not trust it's authority, and hence, does not trust your chained certificate. The work-around until GoDaddy adds the G2 CA server to the default truststore is to simply rekey your cert using SHA-1. –  SnakeDoc Jan 14 at 0:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

My initial post/question was regarding why my chain was not working. It became obvious I had a bad setup (which was quickly fixed with some advice from @Bruno and others - thanks). However, when my corrected chain still did not work with Java, it became apparent there was a much bigger problem lurking. It took a while, but the problem is actually with GoDaddy.

This actually is indeed a GoDaddy problem (I've had lengthy support emails with them).

They have 2 CA servers, one called Class 2 CA and the other called G2 CA. Their Class 2 CA signs all SHA-1 certificates, while the G2 CA signs all their SHA-2 certificates.

This is where the problem lies - GoDaddy has not added their newer G2 CA server to the default Java truststore/keystore - causing default Java installations to not trust it's authority, and hence, does not trust your chained certificate.

The work-around until GoDaddy adds the G2 CA server to the default truststore/keystore is to simply rekey your cert using SHA-1 as-to get a cert signed by the Class 2 CA server. Rekeying is free for GoDaddy customers until your cert expires (obviously).

Once you have a SHA-1 cert signed by the Class 2 CA server, your trust chain should work as expected and no custom truststore/keystore imports and/or setup is required.

It does not make me happy that I must use a "weaker" cert in order to get it to work properly, and discussions with GoDaddy via email support thus far have indicated they have no current plans to add the G2 CA server to the default truststore/keystore. I guess until they do add it, make sure you get a SHA-1 Class 2 CA server signed cert if you plan to work with Java.

share|improve this answer
2  
This solution worked for me when our windows mobile 6.5 devices would not authenticate with our webservices. Thanks so much for the help –  Ben Anderson Feb 28 at 20:37
    
Thanks for your research on this and for sharing. In the Java Control Panel, on the Advanced tab, there is an option for 'Use certificates and keys in browser keystore,' so it should not be checking the cert against the Java keystore (I would think). But when I use Google Chrome, I'm still having a problem... –  Baodad Jul 31 at 21:20

Following comments and the output of openssl s_client -connect the.server.name:587 -starttls smtp.

In a certificate chain, cert n should be issued by cert n+1 in the list: the issuer (i) of cert n should be the subject (s) of cert n+1.

 0 s:/OU=Domain Control Validated/CN=smtp.somecompany.com
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
 1 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
 2 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2
 3 s:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./OU=http://certs.godaddy.com/repository//CN=Go Daddy Secure Certificate Authority - G2
   i:/C=US/ST=Arizona/L=Scottsdale/O=GoDaddy.com, Inc./CN=Go Daddy Root Certificate Authority - G2

Here, cert 0 is issued by cert 1 (fine), cert 1 is issued by cert 2 (fine), cert 2 is self-signed (also fine, this is the root CA).

However, cert 2 isn't issued by cert 3. Cert 3 is misplaced (and probably the same as cert 1). This is likely to cause problems, since this makes the chain invalid.

You should at least remove cert 3 from your configuration. In addition, you can also remove cert 2, since having root CAs isn't necessary (it's up to the client to know it anyway).

share|improve this answer
1  
How did you configure your mail server? I'm not sure what kind of configuration Zimbra uses (if that's what you're using). –  Bruno Sep 12 '13 at 18:04
1  
My guess is that the bundle already contained the g2 cert. One way or another, you really only need 2 certs here: cert 0 (your cert) and cert 1 (the intermediate G2). I'd check the content of the bundle files. You can feed each --BEGIN/END-- section into openssl x509 -text -noout to see what these certs are. –  Bruno Sep 12 '13 at 18:12
1  
I'm surprised you need to regenerate the CSR. I would try to reconfigure with the existing certs before going through the CA process again. It looks like there are some command-line tools if the wizard doesn't help: wiki.zimbra.com/wiki/… I don't really know Zimbra, but it looks Java-based. If you can find where its keystore is, you might be able to re-import the chain with keytool if you've found the right alias (same method as here). –  Bruno Sep 12 '13 at 18:18
1  
Just to make sure, have you tried to import that root CA into your security/cacerts file with keytool? (I'd make a copy of the original file first, also make sure it's the one used by your application, if you have both JDK and standalone JRE installed, for example). –  Bruno Sep 13 '13 at 14:57
1  
I was able to basically confirm the G2 CA is not default trusted by java yesterday - see this godaddy link: support.godaddy.com/groups/ssl-certificates/forum/topic/… -- godaddy has their "Class 2 CA" added to the default truststore, but not the "G2 CA". So the gist... it basically wont work by default unless I manually set the keystore to trust that CA on every deployed machine this program will run on... a PITA imho. –  SnakeDoc Sep 13 '13 at 15:43

It sounds like your mail server is not signed by Go Daddy Class 2 Certification Authority, but is actually signed by one of their intermediate certificate authorities. You will need to verify this for yourself. Assuming this is the case...

In theory, your software should work - since the intermediate certificate is signed by the class 2 authority and you have the class 2 authority in the default JDK certificate store. However, I have found that it just does not work unless you also add the intermediate certificate to your certificate store. Here is a link to a blog post describing a similar experience:

http://drcs.ca/blog/adding-godaddy-intermediate-certificates-to-java-jdk/

Here is a direct link to more GoDaddy intermediate certificates: https://certs.godaddy.com/anonymous/repository.pki

I cannot advise on exactly which certificate you must add - it depends on which CA is used in your mail server.

[update]

is there a way to do this programmically?

Maybe. Depends on what you want to do. I have used the java.security.KeyStore class to automatically update a private keystore directly from Java code without using keytool. It is conceptually simple - load the keystore from a file, read the new certificate, add it to the keystore and then write out the keystore to new file. However it takes a while to get the details right and it may not be worth the trouble just to import a single certificate.

Still, it is interesting to try. Checkout KeyStore JavaDoc and read up on the load, store and setCertificateEntry methods.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 as this seems to be the underlying culprit - it is signed by the intermediate authority, not the main Class 2 authority... rats! -- the link you posted on how to import the cert seems fine and all, but is there a way to do this programmically? I'd like to avoid having to ship the product with cert files and have some script install them... there's too many variables that could go wrong, such as installation system os, etc... –  SnakeDoc Sep 11 '13 at 17:34
    
@SnakeDoc see update –  Guido Simone Sep 11 '13 at 18:26
    
Ok, I'm going to accept this as the answer, since it's more "proper" solution than my hacky-work-around below. My workaround basically ignores the keystore and says "trust this server's cert", at least from my understanding... making your solution more permanent and elegant. –  SnakeDoc Sep 11 '13 at 18:59
2  
FYI, this has been filed as a JDK bug. Note also that GoDaddy has issued a cross certificate from the G2 to the G1 root (the one used by the mail server). You should be able to download the "Go Daddy G1 to G2 Cross Certificate" and configure the mail server certificate chain to include this certificate at the end of the chain. Then the JRE will be able to build a trusted chain from the G2 root in the cacerts file. –  Bill Shannon Sep 16 '13 at 22:07

In the "Java Control Panel" I just added the GD Root Certificate to the "Secure Site CA" and I no longer have the cert error when using Java. The cert I added was: Go Daddy Class 2 Certification Authority Root Certificate - G2

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Update - this "solution" is no longer valid (see my above accepted answer) - keeping this answer because it did help alleviate the problem so long as the side-effects are tolerable.

Ok, I may have found a work-around for my case.

props.put("mail.smtp.ssl.trust", "smtp.somecompany.com");

I added this to my Session construction, and now it works. This is a work-around, not a fix imho since I still do not know why my Godaddy SSL cert is not default trusted... it is not a self-signed cert.

Anyone please feel free to chime in as I'd really like to understand this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I know, this disables the certificate verification for that particular host, which isn't a good idea. –  Bruno Sep 11 '13 at 18:38
    
right, this is why i call this a work-around instead of a solution. in my particular case, it's a server here at our office, but would still be susceptible to a man-in-the-middle attack since it will always trust whatever cert the server responds with... even if it's changed or wrong. –  SnakeDoc Sep 11 '13 at 19:01

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