Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was asked this question in an interview. I am given a code that will cause a run-time error. For eg.

main()
{
    main();
}

Now i have to write some code to detect this run time error and was also asked to correct the error.

The answer I gave to detect the run-time error was:

main()
{
    try
    { 
        main();
    }
    catch(std::runtime_error e) 
    {
    }
}

Please tell me how to fix the problem of run time error once it is detected. One idea i can think of is ''displaying a message to user and calling exit(0)' within the catch block to safely terminate . Is there a better solution?

share|improve this question
    
The "better solution" in this case is just to not write that code which causes an error. When you can't avoid it (e.g. when you have a system call that might fail) then you have to decide whether to terminate, or try to continue in the circumstances. If you're out of memory and you need it, then there's often little better alternative than to just quit, but you might want to keep going just for long enough for a user to save her work first, for instance. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 11 '13 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since there is practically no code here, there is no clear answer because there isnt really other code to escape to. The best I can think of is what you said, just print out an error message and terminating the program. Perhaps instead of explicitly calling exit(0) (probably should be exit(1) in this case) I would just let the program run to completion, but the difference is trivial.

share|improve this answer
int main() {
    static bool s_isMainCalled = false;
    if (s_isMainCalled) {
        // show error or print error or return the error to caller.
        return 1; // To indicate the recursion
    }

    s_isMainCalled = true;

    main();

    /* ???????????*/
    return 0;
}

Assume above source code is compiled to executable & called from terminal.

# g++ recursive-test.c -o recursive-test

#./recursive-test

#echo $? /*$? will have the return value of last executed command, here you will get 1 */

(Note: In C++ you can't handle stack overflow or segmentation faults using exceptions)

share|improve this answer

The semantic equivalent of main() recursively calling itself, with no other code present, if we could assume an infinite stack, would pretty much just be an infinite loop. So, something like this:

int main()
{ while (1); // or "for (;;);" or any one of many other alternate forms...
}

Of course that doesn't really "detect the run time error", since the condition that caused the error has been removed...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.