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This part of my code:

    char MAC_ADRESSES[MAX_LINES][100];
    for(j=i+1; j<=countlines; j++)
        {
            if((MAC_ADRESSES[j])==(MAC_ADRESSES[i]))
            {
                MAC_ADRESSES[j] = NULL;
            }

At the point where I want to change the string with a NULL I have a compiler error about incompatible types assignment. Do not understand why..

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ed Heal, Jim Balter, H2CO3, P0W, devnull Sep 11 '13 at 18:16

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
What's the definition of MAC_ADRESSES? –  Carl Norum Sep 11 '13 at 17:56
3  
English is not a context-free language. "mistake" is a synonym for "error" but a "compiler mistake" is not the same as a "compiler error". –  user529758 Sep 11 '13 at 17:58
    
Sorry I edited it. Yes I've got a compiler error. char MAC_ADRESSES[MAX_LINES][100] –  user2758935 Sep 11 '13 at 17:59
    
Why you are not using MAC_ADRESSES[j] = '0' ? –  haccks Sep 11 '13 at 17:59
3  
Since the error message is about incompatible types, why did you think that telling us the type of MAC_ADRESSES (sic) would be irrelevant to figuring out the cause of the problem? –  Jim Balter Sep 11 '13 at 18:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Presumably MAC_ADRESSES is not an array of pointers. NULL is a pointer (normally (void *)0 in C), so you can't assign it to a non-pointer variable.

Edit: Since your definition is char MAC_ADRESSES[MAX_LINES][100], you have a 2D array, not an array of pointers. You can't store NULL in this array. You can wipe out a string by putting a null character in the first byte, though:

            MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = '\0';

Note that you can't test strings for equality using ==, either. You should be using strcmp.

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I think you need this

for(j=i+1; j<=countlines; j++)
    {
        if(strcmp(MAC_ADRESSES[j],MAC_ADRESSES[i]) == 0)
        {
            MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = 0;
        }
    }

Given that

char MAC_ADRESSES[MAX_LINES][100]

As I guess you are trying to remove duplicates

BTW MAC_ADDRESS[j] is an array - not a pointer! Hence == operator will not make any sense

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NULL is defined something like below

#define NULL (void*)0

So you can't assign void* type to char[][].(both are incompatible types)

If you want to invalidate use '\0' or 0;

MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = '\0';

      (or)

MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = 0;

(Note: Also you should use strcmp / stricmp / strcasecmp to compare the c string & == is not allowed on array bases)

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Instead of NULL use '\0'

NULL is macros defined as

#define NULL (void *)0

or

#define NULL 0 , hence the

warning: assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast

As per your edited question use:

MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = '\0';

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because you're trying to assign a value to an array, as Carl Norum points out. –  Elchonon Edelson Sep 11 '13 at 18:06
    
@same error ? If you've char MAC_ADRESSES[MAX_LINES][100] Obviously MAC_ADRESSES[j] = NULL; is not valid use MAC_ADRESSES[j][0] = '\0'; –  P0W Sep 11 '13 at 18:08

if MAC_ADRESSES isn't a pointer array then MAC_ADRESSES[j] = NULL; is wrong because NULL is a pointer and MAC_ADRESSES is not

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