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Please help me my head is ready to blow

#include<stdio.h>
int main(void){
    unsigned short sum1=0;unsigned short counter=0;

    printf("Enter the number of integers you want to sum\n");scanf("%hd",&counter);
    for (unsigned int i=1;i<=counter;++i)
    { 
        printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);
        sum1 =0;// 2 iteration sum =0;
        printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);

        for(unsigned int j=1;j<=i;++j)
            sum1 =sum1+j;// 1 iteration sum=1;
        printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n\n",i,sum1);
    }
return 0;
}

Until now the book I read In the nested loops used to put curly braces But not in this example... Question 1) Why in the second iteration sum will be 3 and not 2 (I ask this because sum initializes to 0 before go to the nested for ) ? Question 2) Why when I want to printf() the j hits error ? Can anyone explain me EXACTLY HOW THIS PROGRAM WORKS ? I mean 1st iteration,2nd Iteration.... Thank you Brothers....

share|improve this question
    
@haccks as much an improvement your edit makes to the code structure, I think it kind of takes away from the question, which was about understanding the confusing block of code. By reformatting it, you have removed most of the confusion. –  Jordan Sep 11 '13 at 18:42
    
@Jordan; I did this for OP. –  haccks Sep 11 '13 at 18:52
1  
@haccks That's fine, I'm not saying if I think what you did was bad or anything, but anyone else coming to this question for help might not understand what this question was really about. (Which is probably an unlikely event anyway :P ) –  Jordan Sep 11 '13 at 18:54
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This code:

for (unsigned int i=1;i<=counter;++i)
{ printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);
sum1 =0;// 2 iteration sum =0;
printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);
for(unsigned int j=1;j<=i;++j)
sum1 =sum1+j;// 1 iteration sum=1;
printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n\n",i,sum1);}

is equivalent to:

for (unsigned int i=1;i<=counter;++i) { 
    printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);
    sum1 =0;// 2 iteration sum =0;
    printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n",i,sum1);
    for(unsigned int j=1;j<=i;++j) {
        sum1 =sum1+j;// 1 iteration sum=1;
    }
    printf("The i is %d and the sum is %d\n\n",i,sum1);
}

This is because in for-loops without braces, only the very next line is included in the loop.

Now in the first iteration, you will get:

"The i is 1 and the sum is 0"
"The i is 1 and the sum is 0"
"The i is 1 and the sum is 1" //Enters inner for-loop

Second:

"The i is 2 and the sum is 1" //Hasn't reset yet
"The i is 2 and the sum is 0" //Reset
"The i is 2 and the sum is 3" //Sum was 0, then added 1 when j was 1, 
                              //then added 2 when j was 2

Now, the reason you can't print j, is because your printf statements are all outside of your inner for-loop, so j is not defined :)

share|improve this answer
    
No it isn't equivalent... With {} prints more results.... I understand that the printf() inside the nested loop printed ONLY when i=j; And that the nested for every time is being initialized!!!! Is this Right? –  paulakis Sep 11 '13 at 18:30
    
@paulakis I think you are misinterpreting how the for-loop structures work without braces. I don't believe there is a printf() inside the nested loop at all. –  Jordan Sep 11 '13 at 18:34
    
I have understand why sum take this values (My first question answered) I haven't understand why the j isn't visible –  paulakis Sep 11 '13 at 18:36
    
j is only in scope inside the for-loop where it is defined. Once that loop is over, basically the j disappears. Because the loop with j is only around this line sum1 =sum1+j;// 1 iteration sum=1;, the printf is outside the loop, therefore j does not exist. –  Jordan Sep 11 '13 at 18:39
    
Thank you my brother for your time.... I appreciate.... I can understand the scope with curly braces and when a variable is visible but in here.... HMHMHM Is somewhat weird... THank you ANYWAY –  paulakis Sep 11 '13 at 18:45
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In C you cannot declare your variables inside a for-loop sequence:

for(int i=0; i<=10; i++) is wrong
And
int i;
for (i=0; i<=10; i++) is correct

Also you can say int a,b,c=3; instead of declaring them separately int a, int b, int c=3;

To help with your question ( I wish I could comment, but I need more reputation), if your statement (for, if, while) has just one (or none) operations to do, you don't need the curly braces:
for (i=0; i<=10; i++)
        printf("%i ", i);

When having more operations, you need a curly brace for the compilator to know how many of them are inside the for loop:

for (i=0; i<=10; i++){
        printf("%i ", i);
        if(i%2==1)
                printf("Odd number");
        printf("\n");
}

Edit:
int i;
for(i=0; i<=10; i++){
     int j = i+5;
     printf("%i", j);
}
Works very well, but j will not be available outside the for loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
I know that you cant declare variables in the loops but with this trick -std=c99 in the compiler this is working –  paulakis Sep 11 '13 at 18:47
    
It may be working, but it may be better to not start throwing random variables in every for, while. If you have a bigger code, this might actually hurt you as you might think that a variable is supposed to do something, but isn't because it's outside it's scope of view. –  Pirvu Mihai-Cristian Sep 11 '13 at 18:50
    
Who told you that a variable cannot be declared inside a for-loop? –  haccks Sep 11 '13 at 18:50
    
I meant in the for itself, not in it's line of execution. –  Pirvu Mihai-Cristian Sep 11 '13 at 18:53
    
@paulakis In C89 you couldn't declare a variable in the "initialization statement", i.e. for ( /* no declaration here */ ; ...) C99 standard borrowed from C++ the ability to declare vars in almost any point in the code (not only at the beginning of a block, as in C89). This means that for( int i = 1; .... ) is a perfectly legal C statement for C99 and later standards (i.e. not a "trick"). That i variable has limited scope: its scope begins just after the = sign and ends with the last statement of the for body. –  Lorenzo Donati Sep 11 '13 at 19:00
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