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I'm using bootstrap with my web application. I'm trying to get a table design layout to work while still being able to use bootstrap's table-striped class. Currently I'm using the following:

<table>
  <thead>
    <th>ID</th>
    <th>Name</th>
    <th>Department</th>
    <th>Started</th>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>6</td>
      <td>
         <div>John Doe</div>
         <div>12 Sales Total; 4 March, 3 April, 12 July, 14 August</div>
      </td>
      <td>Sales</td>
      <td>Feb. 12th 2010</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

However, I'm wanting the 12 Sales Total; 4 March, 3 April, 12 July, 14 August of the table to appear below John Doe Sales Feb. 12th 2010 and not wrap within the column it's in now. If I use two separate <tr> elements to get the layout to work then the table-striped no longer works properly.

Edit:

So here is the current setup. This gets what I want except for the issue where the text on the div doesn't span the other columns, and just wraps within the column it's currently in. http://jsfiddle.net/AkT6R/

I've tried something earlier that was mentioned in a submitted answer by @Bryce, but this isn't compatible with Bootstrap it seems. http://jsfiddle.net/AkT6R/1/

share|improve this question
    
You can have a <td> element span across multiple columns with the colspan attribute. Similarly you can use the rowspan attribute to span multiple rows. You won't be able to make 1 div inside a <td> span multiple columns without some very clever CSS. Your best bet is to alter the cell that has the name and move the sales totals to a new row with the colspan set to 4. – Chris Rasco Sep 11 '13 at 18:39
    
Please make a fiddle – Alex W Sep 11 '13 at 18:42
    
@AlexW, sorry updated the post with them. – daveomcd Sep 11 '13 at 19:32
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Like so. You need rowspan plus colspan:

<table border=1>
  <thead>
    <th>ID</th>
    <th>Name</th>
    <th>Department</th>
    <th>Started</th>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td rowspan=2>6</td>
      <td>
         <div>John Doe</div>
      </td>
      <td>Sales</td>
      <td>Feb. 12th 2010</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan=3>
         <div>12 Sales Total; 4 March, 3 April, 12 July, 14 August</div>
        </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

See it in action at http://jsfiddle.net/brycenesbitt/QJ4m5/2/


Then for your CSS problem. Right click and "Inspect element" in Chrome. Your background color comes from bootstrap.min.css. This applies a color to even and odd rows:

.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(odd)>td,
.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(odd)>th
{
background-color: #f9f9f9;
}

Fiddle it appropriately for your double sized rows:

.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(4n+1)>td,
.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(4n+2)>td
{    background-color: #ff10ff;
}
.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(4n+3)>td,
.table-striped>tbody>tr:nth-child(4n+4)>td
{    background-color: #00ffff;
}

Done.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried something similar to this, but using this method doesn't seem to work with Bootstrap. – daveomcd Sep 11 '13 at 18:59
    
Start by accepting a solution here if you like, forking the fiddle above, and then you can reformulate a question targeted to bootstrap. Structurally the rowspan/colspan solution is 100% correct, now your challenge apparently lies with bootstrap. – Bryce Sep 11 '13 at 19:13
    
Based on your edit, I added the CSS solution. Don't resist the row/colspan approach: it really is the best way forward. – Bryce Sep 12 '13 at 5:19
    
thanks! works very well – daveomcd Sep 12 '13 at 13:26

Use the colspan tag attribute.

<td colspan="2">

or

    <td colspan="4">

Reference

share|improve this answer
    
This was my first thought too. I don't know if this is what he's looking for though. It seems like he wants his nested div to span the columns, but still have the columns otherwise. – Steven V Sep 11 '13 at 18:38
1  
I was wondering about that, too, but thought I would answer the possible and let him clarify his request if necessary – gibberish Sep 11 '13 at 18:39

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