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I have a case statement which evaluates an integer (result of a function) for a result code, like this:

  R:= DoSomething;
  case R of
    0: begin
      //Success
    end;
    1..99: begin
      //Specific result messages
    end;
    100..199: begin
      //Other specific result messages
    end;        
    -MAXINT..-1: begin
      //Failure
    end;
  end;

If it's a failure, it returns a negative number representing an error code. DoSomething is just any function which returns an integer as a response code (or error code, being a negative). If it is an error, it gets passed on to another error handler. If it's a success, it gets passed on to a success handler (continue, etc.). Positive values will be handled by various specific handlers.

I was wondering if there's another way to write -MAXINT..-1. Something more along the lines of "Anything -1 and under". I tried <=-1 but the compiler didn't like that too much.

Is there a way to do this in a case statement?

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1  
What of positive values? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 12 '13 at 0:59
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Well those would be handled by other case statements, but I didn't want to include every possible one in this question, since those aren't necessarily relevant (although the same applies for positive) –  Jerry Dodge Sep 12 '13 at 1:00
1  
In the end there will be many specific positive numbers, in which I will handle in ranges of 1..99, 100..199, 200..299, etc. But those details aren't relevant to the question. –  Jerry Dodge Sep 12 '13 at 1:09
1  
I disagree. :-) That detail is highly relevant to the question. Without it, you don't need a case at all. You should edit to at least include a comment about handling the positive numbers as well. (If that detail had been there, I would not have made my comment here or to Larry's answer about forcing a needless case.) –  Ken White Sep 12 '13 at 1:25
2  
Note that minimum integer value is - MAXINT - 1. - MAXINT is MAXINT sign changed. –  Sertac Akyuz Sep 12 '13 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're trying to force a strict case where you should use a combination of if and case instead:

if R = 0 then
  // Success
else 
  if R < 0 then
    // Failure
  else
  begin  // Positive values
    case R of
       1..99: ...
     100..199: ...
     // Other expected values
     else
       // Unexpected positive value
     end;
  end;

I personally would format the above to make the flow a little more clear, but that's my own preference:

if R = 0 then
  // Success
else if R < 0 then
  // Failure
else
begin  // Positive values
  case R of
     1..99: ...
   100..199: ...
   // Other expected values
   else
     // Unexpected positive value
   end;
end;

Or, better yet (as mentioned by Larry in a comment to my answer but strangely not in his):

if R < 0 then
  // Failure
else
begin
  case R of 
      0:  // Success
      1..99: // Expected positive values
    100..199:
  else
      // Unexpected positives
  end;
end;  
share|improve this answer
1  
0 is an expected result (one of what I gather are a number of possible successful return codes) and it seems to me it should be handled with its peers as just another expected value within the case statement. –  Larry Lustig Sep 12 '13 at 1:43
    
@Larry: OK. That's your preference. It would probably be mine as well, but that's not what the question asked. :-) And your posted answer doesn't handle it that way either. Edited to add that alternative. –  Ken White Sep 12 '13 at 1:44

Use the else block for all unhandled results and within that block differentiate between failed execution, and successful execution for which you don't have an explicit handler (this last situation is one you don't seem to have contemplated in your example code).

  R:= DoSomething;
  case R of
     0: begin
       //Success
     end;
     1: begin
       // Another success
     end
     else begin
        if R >= 0 then 
           // Unhandled successful execution error
        else 
           //Failure
       end;
   end;
share|improve this answer
    
Don't necessarily need R >= 0, just R > 0 –  Jerry Dodge Sep 12 '13 at 1:17
    
Technically, you only need R > LAST_HANDLED_RETURN_CODE. However, if you're managing a large set of cases it would be good defensive programming that the else block will report any case of R that is accidentally removed from the list of explicitly handled cases. If you write R > 0 and then remove the 0 case, your program will give you an error message as if the function returned a failure code when, in fact, it would have returned a success code that you forgot to handle. –  Larry Lustig Sep 12 '13 at 1:20
    
@Ken: According to the comments, the real problem involves a long string of cases. If there were only three cases, an if statement would be more appropriate. But with 10 or 20 parallel cases, I think the OP is correct to use case. An alternative, of course, would be to nest the case inside the if so that only positive values are submitted to the case switch, but an else would still be required in the case in the event of unhandled success codes. –  Larry Lustig Sep 12 '13 at 1:24
    
@Larry: If the specific desire is to intentionally ignore values > 0, there's no "defensive programming" involved - you've intentionally ignored them. However, based on Jerry's "non-relevant detail" of actually wanting to handle positives (as indicated in his comment to the question), my comment above is no longer applicable (it was based on what he said about only handling values of 0 and < 0). He's changed the question, and I'll delete the comment. :-) –  Ken White Sep 12 '13 at 1:28
    
+1; I like the way you do the nesting into concise and readable code. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Sep 12 '13 at 6:27

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