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I want to add the values of variables declared from user inputs in different methods so how to sum all the variable values which are results from different methods like sum=a+c+d and declare some statements depending on the sum.

class Mets
  attr_accessor :wp
  attr_accessor :hdl
  attr_accessor :tc
  def initialize(wp,hdl,tc)
    @wp =  wp`enter code `
    @hdl = hdl
    @tc  = tc  
  end

  `
  #type the wp number within the ranges and enter it will return "a" value pertaining to that range

  print"what is the wp?"
  wp=gets.to_i
  case wp
  when 95..100  then  print "a=1\n"
  when 101..102 then  print "a=2\n"
  when 103..110 then  print  "a=3\n"
  when 111..120 then  print  "a=4\n" 
  when 121..130 then  print  "a=5\n"  
  end

  #type the hdl  number  within the ranges and enter it will return "a"  value pertaining  to that range

  print"what is the hdl?"
  hdl=gets.to_i
  case hdl
  when 40..49 then  print "c=1\n"
  when 10..39 then print "c=3\n"
  end

  #type the tc  number  within the ranges and enter it will return "a"  value pertaining     to that range

  print "what is the tc?"
  tc=gets.to_i
  case tc
  when  160..199 then print "d=2\n"
  when  200..239 then  print "d=4\n"
  when  240..279 then  print "d=5\n"
  when  280..500 then print "d=6\n" 
  end
end
 #output: you see values of a,c,d printing pertaining to that ranges,now i want to add all this variables(a,c,d) declared after user inputs ?please suggest what has to be done
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closed as unclear what you're asking by the Tin Man, Unknown, depa, sawa, Neil Slater Sep 13 '13 at 14:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What's your question? –  Drew Sep 12 '13 at 2:27
3  
Your formatting needs major work. Please take the time to make it more readable. You'll drive off potential answerers by making them strain to understand what you want. –  the Tin Man Sep 12 '13 at 2:29
    
Really, what is your question, where is your code that shows what you are trying to accomplish and where it fails, and what you expect to happen. –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 2:31
1  
OK, but don't tell me, post it in your question so that it becomes obvious without needing to search for clarification in the comments. –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 2:55
1  
Your title should be a very concise but accurate description of the question, the question should be in the body of your message. There are a few resources to read about asking questions on SO. A Clear Title and How to ask a good question. –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 3:19
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2 Answers

class Mets
  attr_accessor :wp
  attr_accessor :hdl
  attr_accessor :tc
  def initialize(wp, hdl, tc)
    @wp  = wp # `enter code `
    @hdl = hdl
    @tc  = tc
  end

  def total
    @wp + @hdl + @tc
  end
end

total =  Mets.new(2, 3, 5).total
puts "The total is: #{total}"

That is how you would add instance variables.

If you wanted to take advantage of your attr_accessors you could do this instead:

def total
  wp + hdl + tc
end

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
i tried both the above methods in the same context whatever my code posted earlier and adding method as suggested but it gives errors when i try to add the instance variables in the place of 2,3,5 in ur code kindly suggest –  user2770862 Sep 12 '13 at 17:42
    
The code outside of the class doesn't need or wouldn't have instance variables. Passing in the values is what gives the instance variables their value. That last method version above would take the place of the method inside the class of the same name. Not sure where you are going wrong, otherwise. Also, can't see the errors if you don't show them. –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 20:52
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I interpreted your question as merely asking how to best organize your code. (To be honest, I was thinking of how to deal with a more general case.) Here's one approach. The key is the last method in class Mets, which provides a 'hook' for each of the token classes that follow. To change, delete or add a token, just modify, delete or add the applicable subclass. Note that the array @subclasses is a class instance variable. I assumed all you wanted was the sum of values you referred to. If I misunderstood, it should be easy to modify the code to suit your requirements. It may well contain bugs.

class Mets
  class << self
    attr_reader :subclasses
  end

  @subclasses = []

  def self.calc_sum
    Mets.subclasses.inject do |t, subclass|
       sci = subclass.new
       print "What is the #{sci.token}? "
       t + sci.response(gets.to_i) # Have not worried about out-of-range entries
    end
  end

  def self.inherited(subclass)
    Mets.subclasses << subclass
  end
end    

class Mets_wp < Mets
  def token() 'wp' end
  def response(val)
    case val
    when  95..100 then 1
    when 101..102 then 2
    when 103..110 then 3
    when 111..120 then 4 
    when 121..130 then 5
    end
  end
end

class Mets_hdl < Mets
  def token() 'hdl' end
  def response(val)
    case val
    when 10..39 then 3
    when 40..49 then 1
    end
  end
end

...and so on

Mets.calc_sum
share|improve this answer
    
With the nod that the else nil is not needed, it will happen by default. I almost changed my code to return 0, but then I realized that was not in OP's code. –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 6:35
    
@vgoff Thanks, Victor. I removed those lines. (We crossed paths at Ruby Learning.) –  Cary Swoveland Sep 12 '13 at 12:24
    
I know, you are memorable. :) –  vgoff Sep 12 '13 at 20:48
    
@vgoff In the words of a well-known vocalist from Montreal, "back then I was just a kid with a crazy dream". –  Cary Swoveland Sep 12 '13 at 22:49
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