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I want to have a Workspace that contains two projects (2 different apps), a Common (shared) project and a couple of Pods.

I have been struggling to get the App1 project to "see" the Common classes.

My thinking was:

  1. Create the workspace
  2. Create the two app projects (App1 and App2)
  3. Create the Common project
  4. Create Podfile

The Podfile I have is along the lines of this:

workspace 'MyApps'
xcodeproj 'App1/App1.xcodeproj'
xcodeproj 'App2/App2.xcodeproj'
xcodeproj 'Common/Common.xcodeproj'

target :App1 do
    platform :ios, '6.0'
    pod 'AFNetworking', '~> 1.3.2'
    xcodeproj 'App1/App1.xcodeproj'
end

target :App2 do
    platform :ios, '6.0'
    pod 'AFNetworking', '~> 1.3.2'
    xcodeproj 'App2/App2.xcodeproj'
end

target :Common do
    platform :ios, '6.0'
    pod 'AFNetworking', '~> 1.3.2'
    xcodeproj 'Common/Common.xcodeproj'
end

I have seen this question but I can't seem to get the Common code to be available in the Apps.

Do I have to manually update the search paths for each of the Apps projects to make it work or can this be solved via the Podfile?

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how about making "Common" be a pod? CocoaPods supports local files. –  Hai Feng Kao Dec 3 '13 at 19:08
    
Are you building "Common" as a static library? If not, you should just need to make sure all the classes you want to use are part of the build process for each target that wants to use them. Also make sure your header search paths correctly point to the "Common" files for each target. –  gdavis Dec 15 '13 at 20:56
    
I am trying to avoid having to update a Pod (common) every time I need a change in both App1 and App2. –  nicktmro Mar 10 at 3:06

2 Answers 2

i had a similar problem at work, and i found it was better to change the project structure to work with Cocoapods.

i think the right solution for you, or at least the right path to one, is to turn your common project into a local (see "Using the files from a local path" here), private pod.

i implemented my common project as such, and have my Application project also configured with CocoaPods, using that private pod.

a final word of note, when building a common library project through CocoaPods, you'll want to override the 'Other Linker Flags' build setting in that project, just like it is in the Pods project created and managed by CocoaPods.

¡let me know if this works for you!

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Sweet. Say you're working on App1 and you need to make a change to the Common project. Do you go to a separate workspace, update the private Pod and then update the workspace for App1 and App2? –  nicktmro Mar 10 at 3:08
    
that may be what you'll need to do. however if you're creating a local pod, and referencing it in your other project by Path rather than by repo, you're literally editing the same file, so no worries. if you're trying to use your common code as a library pod, you'll need to recompile and all that jazz. ¿does that make sense? –  calql8edkos Mar 11 at 13:45

I have just posted an answer on this topic in the context of multiple targets - should apply to multiple projects to: Multiple targets depending on same cocoapods

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