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Question: What is the preferred/best/accepted practice for passing data (beyond primitives) to a background task using Grand Central Dispatch (GCD)?

What concerns me with objective C blocks is this: Variables accessed by the block are copied to the block data structure on the heap so that the block can access them later. Copied pointer references could mean multiple threads are accessing the same object.

I'm still fairly new to objective C and iOS but I'm not new threads (C++, Java, C, C#).

Code set #1 (Primitive Copy from scope)

//Primitive int
int taskIdBlock = self->taskNumber;

//declare a block that takes in an ID and sleep time.
void (^runTask)(int taskId, int sleepTime);

//Create and assign the block
runTask = ^void(int taskId, int sleepTime)
{
    NSLog(@"Running Task: %d", taskId);
    // wait for x seconds before completing this method
    [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:sleepTime];

    //update the main UI
    //tell the main thread we are finished with this task.
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^
                   {
                       NSLog(@"Completed Task %d",taskId);
                   });
};

//Get the global concurrent dispatch queue and launch a few  tasks
dispatch_queue_t globalConcurrentQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);

//TASK #1
//increment the task number and log
NSLog(@"Create Task Number %d", ++taskIdBlock);

//dispatch the task to the global queue. 
dispatch_async(globalConcurrentQueue, ^{
    runTask(taskIdBlock,5);
});

//TASK #2
//increment the task number and log
NSLog(@"Create Task Number %d", ++taskIdBlock);

//dispatch the task to the global queue.
dispatch_async(globalConcurrentQueue, ^{

    runTask(taskIdBlock,3);
});

Output:

Create Task Number 1
Create Task Number 2
Running Task: 1
Running Task: 2
Completed Task 2
Completed Task 1

Code set #2 (Object Reference Copy from scope)

//Integer Object
NSInteger *taskIdBlock = &(self->taskNumber);

//declare a block that takes in an ID and sleep time.
void (^runTask)(int taskId, int sleepTime);

//Create and assign the block
runTask = ^void(int taskId, int sleepTime)
{
    NSLog(@"Running Task: %d", taskId);
    // wait for x seconds before completing this method
    [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:sleepTime];

    //update the main UI
    //tell the main thread we are finished with this task.
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^
                   {
                       NSLog(@"Completed Task %d",taskId);
                   });
};

//Get the global concurrent dispatch queue and launch a few  tasks
dispatch_queue_t globalConcurrentQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);

//TASK #1
//increment the task number and log
NSLog(@"Create Task Number %d", ++(*taskIdBlock));

//dispatch the task to the global queue. 
dispatch_async(globalConcurrentQueue, ^{
    runTask(*taskIdBlock,5);
});

//TASK #2
//increment the task number and log
NSLog(@"Create Task Number %d", ++(*taskIdBlock));

//dispatch the task to the global queue.
dispatch_async(globalConcurrentQueue, ^{

    runTask(*taskIdBlock,3);
});

Output:

Create Task Number 1
Running Task: 2
Create Task Number 2
Running Task: 2
Completed Task 2
Completed Task 2

Notice the 1st line in each piece of code. Primitive int to Object NSinteger. I would have like to seen something like this:

dispatch_async(globalConcurrentQueue,runTask(*taskIdBlock,3));

However this does not compile. I can only see this getting more difficult in the future so best to get a solid example down first. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You said:

What concerns me with objective C blocks is this: Variables accessed by the block are copied to the block data structure on the heap so that the block can access them later. Copied pointer references could mean multiple threads are accessing the same object.

Yes, capturing pointers in blocks and then accessing/mutating their pointed-to memory could lead to non-interlocked accesses. The typical approach is to use immutable data structures. For instance, you could make an NSData object and because it's NSData and not NSMutableData you know that it cannot change. Capturing a pointer to that NSData in multiple blocks is fine, because one block cannot change the contents of the data out from under another.

If you need shared mutable state between blocks that can execute concurrently, then like with any other multithreaded programming, you need to somehow interlock access to that state. The idiomatic GCD way to do that would be with another dispatch_queue_t. Here's a trivial example:

// This is a pointer to our shared state
NSInteger* sharedStatePtr = calloc(1, sizeof(*sharedStatePtr));

// This is a queue that we will use to protect our shared state
dispatch_queue_t sharedStateAccessQueue = dispatch_queue_create("", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT);

// First work block
dispatch_block_t a = ^{
    __block NSInteger localValue = 0;

    // Safely read from shared state -- ensures no writers writing concurrently -- multiple readers allowed.
    dispatch_sync(sharedStateAccessQueue, ^{ localValue = *sharedStatePtr; });

    // do stuff
    localValue++;

    // Safely write to shared state -- ensures no readers reading concurrently.
    dispatch_barrier_async(sharedStateAccessQueue, { *sharedStatePtr = localValue; });
};

// Second work block
dispatch_block_t b = ^{
    __block NSInteger localValue = 0;

    // Safely read from shared state -- ensures no writers writing concurrently -- multiple readers allowed.
    dispatch_sync(sharedStateAccessQueue, ^{ localValue = *sharedStatePtr; });

    // do stuff
    localValue--;

    // Safely write to shared state -- ensures no readers reading concurrently.
    dispatch_barrier_async(sharedStateAccessQueue, { *sharedStatePtr = localValue; });
};

// Dispatch both blocks to a concurrent queue for execution.
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), a);
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), b);

This does nothing to address the race condition between blocks a and b, but it does ensure that the shared state is not trashed by overlapping writes and reads, and will work for any kind of shared mutable state provided that all accessors/mutators of that shared state only do so via the dispatch_/dispatch_barrier_ pattern.

If you needed to read, do some work and then write atomically, then it would be simpler to use a serial queue, like this:

// This is a pointer to our shared state
NSInteger* sharedStatePtr = calloc(1, sizeof(*sharedStatePtr));

// This is a queue that we will use to protect our shared state
dispatch_queue_t sharedStateAccessQueue = dispatch_queue_create("", DISPATCH_QUEUE_SERIAL);

// First work block
dispatch_block_t a = ^{
    // Do some expensive work to determine what we want to add to the shared state
    NSInteger toAdd = SomeExpensiveFunctionWeWantToExecuteConcurrently();

    dispatch_async(sharedStateAccessQueue, ^{
        *sharedStatePtr = *sharedStatePtr + toAdd;
    });
};

// Second work block
dispatch_block_t b = ^{
    // Do some expensive work to determine what we want to subtract to the shared state
    NSInteger toSubtract = SomeOtherExpensiveFunctionWeWantToExecuteConcurrently();

    dispatch_async(sharedStateAccessQueue, ^{
        *sharedStatePtr = *sharedStatePtr - toSubtract;
    });
};

// Dispatch both blocks to a concurrent queue for execution.
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), a);
dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), b);

While GCD gives you some interesting tools, you still have to be mindful of shared state. While using queues to protect shared state is arguably the idiomatic GCD way to do it, you can also you more classic mechanisms like locks (though it'll likely be slower to do that) or platform atomics like OSAtomicIncrement* and OSAtomicCompareAndSwap* to mutate shared state.

A few more notes: NSInteger is not an object. It's just a convenient typedef that protects API/code from differences in platforms/compile targets (i.e. if you use NSInteger it'll be a 32-bit int on 32-bit platforms and a 64-bit int on 64-bit platforms.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I quickly used NSInteger thinking it was an object and not a typedef. What you put up makes sense. I have to start seeing the tasks 'like' inner threads in Java. Looking forward to seeing if anyone else has any recommendations. – LEO Sep 14 '13 at 16:08

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