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I have read in Wikipedia here that:

A final class cannot be subclassed. This is done for reasons of security and efficiency.

I am wondering about the kind of security that final in Java can achieve?

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marked as duplicate by user93353, Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt, Raedwald, Tala, Dave Sep 12 '13 at 8:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@user93353 - Here's a link from Oracle that says the following about security and the final keyword: "It is better to design APIs with security in mind. Trying to retrofit security into an existing API is more difficult and error prone. For example, making a class final prevents a malicious subclass from adding finalizers, cloning, and overriding random methods (Guideline 4-5)." (It took about 2 seconds to find) –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 6:05
    
@user93353 - Here's another quote from the same link: "Design classes and methods for inheritance or declare them final [6]. Left non-final, a class or method can be maliciously overridden by an attacker. A class that does not permit subclassing is easier to implement and verify that it is secure. Prefer composition to inheritance." If you read that document there are dozens of code examples that make use of the final keyword... and they're not using it because it's fun. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 6:08
3  
Your duplicate question have attracted a large number of bad answer and comments. People are simply believing in everything they've read somewhere in internet. The original question has a reasonable answer: stackoverflow.com/a/2111887/531954 –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Sep 12 '13 at 6:45
1  
@jahroy but It's not Oraclanidy Q&A (as analogy to Christianity Q&A) - referenced to Oracle, Bible or Aristotle are not absolute arguments here, but something that needs to be proven. None of the answers have proven there's some reason behind the Oracle arguments, for example, would any attacker really try to 'maliciously override' a class instead of directly attacking the system? I've expressed my opinion by voting, but I'm not security expert. Let's move the question to Security Q&A and see what would be written there. –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Sep 12 '13 at 7:06
1  
@ŁukaszLech - Again, I completely agree with every statement you've made that claims that the techniques recommended by Oracle do not provide complete security (there's no reason to prove anything). All I'm saying is that nobody is making the claim that you want to refute. Somebody is asking "can a bike helmet make you more safe when you ride a bike" and you're responding by saying "no matter what helmet you wear, you could still get hit by a truck". We're going in circles... I concede you point entirely, but for some reason you can't even consider what anybody else is saying. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 7:15

6 Answers 6

If your class is final, No one can subclass it. If no one can subclass your final class, that means your features of the final class can not be changed by other by reusing your class.

Assume you are technology provider, here you provide API for some banking system, using your API client will implement its banking system.

case: WITHOUT FINAL

This is in your API

class BaseClass{
 public void makeTransaction(){
   }
}

This is client code

class DerivedClass extends BaseClass{
 public void makeTransaction(){
     // naughty client can do something here like:- makeTransaction but transfer 1 dollar for each transaction to my account.
   }
}

case: WITH FINAL This is in your API

final class BaseClass{
 public void makeTransaction(){
   }
}

This is client code

class DerivedClass extends BaseClass{  // not allowed
}

Client has to use make transaction as you have already defined. This is one aspect how final can secure your piece of code.

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2  
upvote for a good example –  Prasad Kharkar Sep 12 '13 at 6:27
2  
False sense of security - if someone can execute arbitrary code, no language trick will make you secure. –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Sep 12 '13 at 6:38
1  
@jahroy I'm not missing the point, I'm agaist stimulating false security sense through techniques, that are not designed for it. It's just like 'securing' the system by proper capitalization of critical methods - it may make developers more aware what those methods are using, or it may not. –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Sep 12 '13 at 6:56
1  
@ŁukaszLech What do you mean by sentence "if someone can execute arbitrary code", please elaborate. –  GauravGupta Sep 12 '13 at 7:25
1  
@ŁukaszLech I think things are going little out of context here. Security provided by final is in sense of accessibility. by re-using i mean "extending". If there is better word i would welcome your suggestion and edit the answer. –  GauravGupta Sep 12 '13 at 7:35

A final class cannot be subclassed. This is done for reasons of security and efficiency.I am wondering about the kind of security that final in Java can achieve?

If a class cannot be subclassed then you cannot override the functionality that a parent class provides in a child class. From a design perspective you are actually finalizing and enforcing a design using final classes. Hence it makes your final class secured in that sense.

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1  
Overriding is the key. +1 –  Christian Mark Sep 12 '13 at 5:12

final does not provide any security whatsoever. It's silly to expect it to. It provides a kind of safety.

Though your question is related to java, I'll point you to Marshall Cline's C++ FAQ which answers a similar question.

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/encap-is-not-security.html

[7.8] Is Encapsulation a Security device?

No.

Encapsulation != security.

Encapsulation prevents mistakes, not espionage.

Let me add that the keywords like public, private, final etc do not prevent intentional misuse. They are just constructs which help enforce design by preventing accidental or unintentional misuse.

A programmer who wants to substitute functionality in the base class can use other ways to do it - the simplest is it to not use the class at all and do his own stuff.

If you want to prevent access or any other thing, do it in the underlying OS, not in your class library.

As always, Wikipedia may be a good starting point for something but is rarely the authoritative source.

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Your link makes the worst argument out of any of anything written in this question. If I want to be as pedantic as you've been in all your comments, I could just ay that the underlying OS cannot provide any security either, because somebody could just hack the machine or write their own code that exploits the OS' vulnerabilities... But that would be (yet another) inane comment. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 5:51
1  
A vulnerable OS isn't a secure OS. So such an OS should not claim it provides security. –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:53
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Here's a link that actually discusses the use of the final keyword in Java (rather than a link that talks about encapsulation in C++)... Note that it's written by Oracle and is titled "Secure coding guidelines for the Java programming language". –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 6:13
1  
It's the only reasonable answer in that thread. I can't believe how easly can people believe some language feature used for enforcing better encapsulation can magically make their code less vulnerable to malicious attacks. –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Sep 12 '13 at 6:43
1  
final is very important in the context of the JVM running in a trusted process with mobile code that may be untrusted. Applets and RMI (old default config) are obvious old examples. You can't realistically do anything like that in C++. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 12 '13 at 14:38

If a class if final than none other class Inherit that class and the

overriding of methods is not possible

. For example, the String class is final so that no one can override and change the methods of the String class.

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1  
So how does that add security? –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:25
    
If I can override methods of String class than I can change the body of my overridden method and than if someone uses my class methods, like... String s = new MyStringClass("hello"); s.reverse(); than he may get the different output... –  Ankit Lamba Sep 12 '13 at 5:33
    
How is preventing a different output adding security? –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:37
    
@user93353: Suppose a method is supposed to only allow access to files whose names start with "G:\". If the method checks whether a string starts with those characters and passes that string [rather than a copy] to another method which opens a file with a specified name, code which changed the string between the time its leading characters were checked and the time it was passed to the other method could access arbitrary files on other drives. –  supercat Sep 4 at 15:44
    
@user93353: In cases requiring real security, code which receives a string should generate a new string containing the same characters and validate the copy, so that even if the supplier of the string is somehow able to modify the original, the string being validated would be the same one passed as a file name, but defensive copying isn't free, and not all methods use such techniques. –  supercat Sep 4 at 15:46

Let's say you work at the bank and your boss ask for a way to validate some customer credentials.

You will have something like that:

public class Validation {

    private Customer customer;

    public Validation(Customer customer) {
        this.customer = customer;
    }

    public boolean validate() {
        return customer.isValid();
    }
}

You must put a final on the class or on the method validate(not sure why nobody mentioned it). This way, if someone wants to extend your class he won't change the validate algorithm(final on method) of he won't extend the class at all(final on class).

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1  
What if his code doesn't call the validate method at all or ignores the return value? What is final going to do to prevent that? –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:28
    
Well.... if the class is final than "his code" can't extend the class OR invoke any of the methods. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 5:32
    
Nothing. But not final classes/methods won't be more sure either. You can of course encapsulate this validate function in another function. Let's say public final double withdrawMoney(Customer customer, double money) { if (new Validation(customer).validate()) { return customer.withdrawMoney(money); } return 0; } . I know, the code is not syntax sugar, but it was just a demo :) –  Silviu Burcea Sep 12 '13 at 5:33
1  
The malicious developer may not use the withdrawMoney call at all. He may just use SQL directly to bypass your withdrawMoney security. Very little can be done against a malicious developer other than a lot of code review. –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:35
1  
@user93353 - You don't seem to be able to accept the fact that the word security doesn't always mean exactly what you want it to mean when you make your arguments. If I told you I want to make my home more secure by adding an alarm system, you'd refute my logic by claiming you could still break into my house by blowing the roof off with a warhead. I don't understand what you're trying to prove. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 5:43

Consider a class named FileBrowser that allows client code to browse files on a network.

You might implement such a class so that certain directories are off limits to certain users.

If FileBrowser is not final, another developer could override its behavior to allow unrestricted access to the network.

Oracle's Secure Coding Guidelines for the Java Programming Language provides multiple examples of how the final keyword can be used for security purposes.

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1  
If another developer wants unrestricted access to the network, he can always not use FileBrowser and write his own code. If you want to prevent unrestricted access to the network, do it by using OS permissions, not by using final keyword. –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:23
    
@user93353 - This is just an example to illustrate a point. You're taking it way too literally. The point is that using the final keyword prevents people from overriding the behavior of your classes. The banking example provided by GauravGupta demonstrates the point better. In that case the inner logic of the BaseClass might be so complicated that it wouldn't be possible to quickly roll your own replacement class. Even if you did roll your own, it might not have acces to the same APIs and protected methods and classes. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 5:27
    
If you want to illustrate a point, give an example that actually illustrates your point. If your point is that final gives security, then give an example that shows how it gives security and not something which can be trivially bypassed. –  user93353 Sep 12 '13 at 5:31
    
@user93353 - I believe my example illustrates the point adequately. To suggest that somebody can just "write their own code" is a useless, vague argument. Obviously anybody can always "write their own code" to do anything if they're smart enough. The final keyword can provide security by preventing other people from extending your classes. I don't see why it's so hard to understand how this is helpful in the case of an API with final classes. –  jahroy Sep 12 '13 at 5:38

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