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I want to know in which package all tcl commands will be available . for example string , list etc .

When we want to use expect , we will use Expect package , similarly we are using these (string , list etc ...) commands without importing any package . i want to know in which package these are all belong ?

basically I came from java ... In java "java.lang" package default.

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Basically, this commands belong to the Tcl package. But there is no such thing as a relationship between commands and packages. –  Johannes Kuhn Sep 12 '13 at 7:25

2 Answers 2

List and strings does not come under any special packages. They are the basic commands. All the variables are treated as a string in tcl.

  $ tclsh
  % set l [list 1 2 3 4 5]
  1 2 3 4 5
  % lappend l 6
  1 2 3 4 5 6
  % set str "Hello, World"
  Hello, World
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Formally, all commands that form the core of the Tcl language are provided by the Tcl package. That package is required for you before you run any code (and has to be; the package command itself is one of those commands). By historical convention, the large majority of Tcl commands are placed in the global namespace, which is on the command resolution path of all namespaces. (It's logically last on the path unless explicitly set with namespace path.) Some Tcl commands are defined in the ::tcl namespace, including a fair number of internal commands, direct access to which are not supported (if it isn't documented, it isn't supported; some are explicitly not supported but are relatively well known nonetheless; they're in the ::tcl::unsupported namespace). The namespace ::oo (and its children) are reserved for TclOO.

Commands defined by other packages — especially any newly-created packages — should be placed in a namespace with the same name as the package. This is merely a convention, and is not followed in older packages (particularly those that predate the namespace mechanism, such as Tk and TclX) because it is reckoned to be more important to maintain backward compatibility with existing scripts, but you will definitely find it easiest if you follow it. Also, it's usually the convention that the global namespace belongs principally to the user-defined application, despite the degree of pollution from other packages; it's yours to mangle as you see fit.

The exported commands of a namespace (which should typically be the public commands of the package with the same name) can be made available in another namespace without qualification via namespace import:

namespace eval ::foo {
    proc grill {} { puts "grill!" }
    namespace export grill
}

namespace eval ::bar {
    namespace import ::foo::grill
    grill
    puts [namespace which grill];   # Prints ::bar::grill
    puts [namespace origin grill];  # Prints ::foo::grill
}

Alternatively (from Tcl 8.5) you can update the resolution path of a namespace so it also looks in the other namespace:

namespace eval ::foo {
    proc grill {} { puts "grill!" }
}

namespace eval ::bar {
    namespace path ::foo
    grill
    puts [namespace which grill];   # Prints ::foo::grill
    puts [namespace origin grill];  # Prints ::foo::grill
}

Note that the two mechanisms are a bit different: with imported commands, there is a local delegate for the command (and as that delegate is actually a command, you can rename it, etc.) whereas with path changes there are no such delegates; the command in the originating namespace is located directly during resolution of what grill means in that context.

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