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Here is my html:

<form>
    <dl>
        <dt>&nbsp;</dt>
        <dd><input type="hidden"></dd>

        <dt>Dont hide this one</dt>
        <dd><input type="text"></dd>
    </dl>
</form>

I'm using jQuery to hide the dt/dd elements where the input type is hidden with this code:

$("input[type=hidden]").each(function() {
    $(this).parent().hide().prev().hide();
});

But I also only want to apply this to dts where the text is &nbsp;. How can I do this sort of select?

Update: Maybe I need to clarify: A few people have posted answers where it hides the dd before checking if the content of the dt is also &nbsp;. Both conditions must be true before hiding both the dt and dd.

Final Solution: Here's what I ended up with:

$('input[type=hidden]').filter(function() {
    return $(this).closest('dd').prev('dt').html() === '&nbsp;';
}).each(function() {
    $(this).closest('dd').hide()
           .prev('dt').hide();
});
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
$("input[type=hidden]").filter(function() {
    return $(this).parent().prev('dt').html() === "&nbsp;";
}).each(function() {
    $(this).parent().hide().prev().hide();
});

This will not select <dt>foo&nbsp;bar</dt>

which contains('&nbsp;') would.

More concisely (with credit to Emil's answer)

$("input[type=hidden]").filter(function() {
    return $(this).closest('dd').prev('dt').html() === "&nbsp;";
}).closest('dd').hide().prev('dt').hide();
share|improve this answer
    
As people have already reposted answers... and I can't comment yet cobbal's code is missing this: $("input[type=hidden]").each(function() { $(this).parent().hide().prev().filter(function() { return $(this).html() === "&nbsp;"; }).hide(); }); return – Skawful Dec 9 '09 at 18:31
    
this doesn't work. it hides the dd before checking if the content of the dt is also &nbsp;. Both conditions must be true before hiding both the dt and dd. – Andrew Dec 9 '09 at 18:54
    
Sorry, misunderstood what you were trying to do. Updated now – cobbal Dec 9 '09 at 19:11
    
perfect! thank you! – Andrew Dec 9 '09 at 19:14

Use the contains selector:

$("dt:contains('&nbsp;')").hide();

share|improve this answer
$("input[type=hidden]").each(function() {
    $(this).closest('dd').hide()
           .prev('dt').hide();
});

This code finds the closest parent of the input with tag dd, hides it, then looks for a dt sibling and hides it as well.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for cleaning up my code and making it more readable. =] – Andrew Dec 9 '09 at 19:16

The contains selector doesn't match the whole content, so it might work for you, but is not an ideal solution. The correct way to do this is to use the filter function:

$('input[type=hidden]').filter(function() {
   return $(this).prev().html() == '&nbsp;'
})
.each(function() {
   $(this).hide();
   $(this).prev().hide();
});
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work. it end up hiding the entire dl. I am only trying to hide the dt and dd where the dt contains &nbsp; and the dd contains a hidden form element. – Andrew Dec 9 '09 at 19:00
    
Oh, I didn't unterstand the question correct, I'm sorry. I changed the code now. – eWolf Dec 10 '09 at 10:59

This also does the trick (adapted from an earlier version of cobbal's answer):

$("input[type=hidden]").each(function() {
    if ($(this).parent().prev().filter(function() {
        return $(this).html() === "&nbsp;";
    }).hide().length > 0) {
        $(this).hide();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think an empty jQuery set evaluates to false, wouldn't the if statement always execute? – cobbal Dec 9 '09 at 19:34
    
D'oh, thank you. Fixed now. – Jeff Sternal Dec 9 '09 at 21:11

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