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I am looking into Migrations in an effort to clean up our deployment processes. The less manual intervention required when pushing a change to production the better.

I have run into 3 major snags with the migrations system. They are show stoppers if I can not figure out a clean way around them.

1. How do I add Seed data per migration:

I execute the command "add-migration" which scaffolds a new migration file with Up and Down functions. Now, I want to automatically make changes to the data with both Up and Down changes. I don't want to add the Seed data to the Configuration.Seed method as this runs for all migrations which ends in all sorts of duplication problems.

2. If the above is not possible, how do I avoid duplications?

I have an enum that I loop through to add the values to the database.

foreach(var enumValue in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Access.Level)))
{
    context.Access.AddOrUpdate(
        new Access { AccessId = ((int)enumValue), Name = enumValue.ToString() }
    );
}
context.SaveChanges();

Even though I am using AddOrUpdate, I still get duplicates in the database. The above code brings me to my 3rd and final problem:

3. How can I seed Primary Keys?

My enumerable with the above code is:

public class Access
{
    public enum Level
    {
        None = 10,
        Read = 20,
        ReadWrite = 30
    }
    public int AccessId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

I am specifying the values that I want as my primary key, but Entity Framework seems to ignore it. They still end up being 1,2,3. How do I get it to be 10,20,30?

Are these limitations of EF at the moment or are they intentional constraints to prevent some other kind of catastrophe I am not seeing?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted
  1. When I have fixed data that I want to insert with a migration, I put the inserts directly in the Up() migration using calls to Sql("Insert ..."). See the note halfway down this page: how to insert fixed data
  2. You prevent duplicates in the Seed method by calling the AddOrUpdate override that takes an identifier expression specifying the natural key - see this answer and this blog entry.
  3. Primary keys that are integers are created as identity fields by default. To specify otherwise use the [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None)] attribute

I think this is a good explanation of Initializer and Seed methods

Here is an example of how to use the AddOrUpdate method:

foreach(var enumValue in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Access.Level)))
{
    context.Access.AddOrUpdate(
        x => x.Name, //the natural key is "Name"
        new Access { AccessId = ((int)enumValue), Name = enumValue.ToString() }
    );
}
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Hi I have found a very useful information for your problem in this link: Safari Books Online

"1. How do I add Seed data per migration:" As you see in the example you need to create a new confiugration for seeding. This seed Configuration must be called after migration.

public sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration
{
    public Configuration()
    {
        AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = false;
    }

    protected override void Seed(SafariCodeFirst.SeminarContext context)
    {
        //  This method will be called after migrating to the latest version.

        //  You can use the DbSet<T>.AddOrUpdate() helper extension method 
        //  to avoid creating duplicate seed data. E.g.
        //
        //    context.People.AddOrUpdate(
        //      p => p.FullName,
        //      new Person { FullName = "Andrew Peters" },
        //      new Person { FullName = "Brice Lambson" },
        //      new Person { FullName = "Rowan Miller" }
        //    );
        //
    }
}

"2. If the above is not possible, how do I avoid duplications?"

AddOrUpdate Must help you exactly to avoding the duplicates if you get an error here you might have a configuration error post the call stack please. See the example!

"3. How can I seed Primary Keys?"

Here it is also on your key definition. If your key DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity) than you do not have to provide it. In some other senarios you need to create a new one it is depending on the key type.

"Are these limitations of EF at the moment or are they intentional constraints to prevent some other kind of catastrophe I am not seeing?"
Not that I know!

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I have got my data in that Seed method. But it keeps adding duplicates even though I use AddOrUpdate. The problem is when I use "add-migration", it does not create it's own configuration.seed. So no matter which migration you execute, it still executes the common Seed method which is not what I want. I want to have a separate Seed method per Migration file. –  Talon Sep 12 '13 at 13:17
    
look I have a similar problem. What I did in the DbMigrationsConfiguration construcator; You have to set the MigrationsNamespace for example this.MigrationsNamespace = "DataAccessLayer.Repository.Migrations"; and in the wished migration file you have to modfiy the namespace according the DbMigrationsConfiguration. This trick I have founded by my self after long fight and now Entity Framework will go only in the wished migration file. I hope this will solve your problem 2. –  Bassam Alugili Sep 12 '13 at 13:31
    
I think in the end of the day, migrations are still in an infant stage and need some time to evolve. I have added what I ended up doing, Sounds like you created a whole new migrations folder with a single migration file in each. I will try it one day but right now I have already wasted too much time and need to hurry on. Thanks for the help! –  Talon Sep 12 '13 at 13:38
1  
The first parameter of the AddOrUpdate method is for preventing duplicates. In the above example, if there is an existing "FullName" that matches, then it does not update. So if you are getting duplicates, check that parameter. –  Greg Gum Mar 16 at 20:29

OK, so with a bit of bashing I have managed to bash EF into submission. Here is what I did:

1. There is no way that I found to see data for a specific migration. It all must go into the common Configuration.Seed method.

2. To avoid duplicates I had to do 2 things. For my enums, I wrote the following seed code:

foreach (var enumValue in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Access.Level)))
{
    var id = (int)enumValue;
    var val = enumValue.ToString();

    if(!context.Access.Any(e => e.AccessId == id))
        context.Access.Add(
            new Access { AccessId = id, Name = val }
        );
}
context.SaveChanges();

So basically, just checking if it exists and adding if not

3. In order for the above to work, you need to be able to insert Primary Key Values. Luckily for me this table will always have the same static data so I could deactivate the auto increment. To do that, the code looks like:

public class Access
{
    public enum Level
    {
        None = 10,
        Read = 20,
        ReadWrite = 30
    }

    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None)]
    public int AccessId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
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