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I have:

x = np.zeros((96,11,11,2,10),dtype=np.float64)
y = np.array([0,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100],dtype=np.float64)
x[:,:,:,0,0] = y
print x[0,:,:,0,0]

i get:

[[   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]
 [   0.   10.   20.   30.   40.   50.   60.   70.   80.   90.  100.]]

but I want the output (for any i in first dimension) to be the transpose of this. ie fill columns instead of rows

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Is this your actual example? Because I don't see how you can assign a 1D array to a 3D slice, and when I try it, as expected, x[:,:,:,0,0] = y raises ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (20,11,11) (10). –  abarnert Sep 12 '13 at 9:06
    
no, its not. I'll edit it now –  Sammy Sep 12 '13 at 9:07
    
now its the real example –  Sammy Sep 12 '13 at 9:15
    
I asked the question again in a better way here: stackoverflow.com/questions/18763717/… –  Sammy Sep 12 '13 at 12:42
1  
@Sammy It is recommend that you edit your question then to ask a new one if the question is, in effect, the same. –  Ophion Sep 12 '13 at 12:54
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3 Answers 3

If you want the output to be the transpose, just do:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.zeros((96,11,11,2,10),dtype=np.float64)
>>> y = np.array([0,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100],dtype=np.float64)
>>> for i in range(x.shape[0]):
>>>    x[i,:,:,0,0] = x[i,:,:,0,0].T
>>> print x[0,:,:,0,0]
 [[   0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.]
  [  10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.]
  [  20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.]
  [  30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.]
  [  40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.]
  [  50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.]
  [  60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.]
  [  70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.]
  [  80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.]
  [  90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.]
  [ 100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.]]

It updates the first dimension, this is the output for 34th index:

>>> print x[34,:,:,0,0]
 [[   0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.]
  [  10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.]
  [  20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.]
  [  30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.]
  [  40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.]
  [  50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.]
  [  60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.]
  [  70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.]
  [  80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.]
  [  90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.]
  [ 100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.]]
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for my confusing wording. I actually want the output to look like the transpose of this (don't want the actual transpose) –  Sammy Sep 12 '13 at 9:17
    
ok, take a look now, you only need to reassign x[0,:,:,0,0].T to x[0,:,:,0,0] –  jabaldonedo Sep 12 '13 at 9:20
    
My point is I want x[1,:,:,0,0] , x[2,:,:,0,0], x[3,:,:,0,0] .....x[95,:,:,0,0] to look like this too. so Im looking for something in the way I initially write to x –  Sammy Sep 12 '13 at 9:35
1  
You don't mention that on your question, you didn't say anything about all dimension but only the first one. In any case, I have updated the answer so now all x[i,:,:,0,0] dimensions are updated –  jabaldonedo Sep 12 '13 at 9:42
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You need to change y from 1D to 2D (with one column):

x[:,:,:,0,0] = y[:, np.newaxis]

or,

x[:,:,:,0,0] = y.reshape(11,1)
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The problem is simple: you're using a row vector for y instead of a column vector, so it's filling by row instead of by column.

More technically, you've got an array of shape (11,), instead of an array of (11, 1), so it broadcasts to (1, 11) when filling a 2D array.

Compare:

>>> x = np.zeros((96,11,11,2,10),dtype=np.float64)
>>> y = np.array([[0],[10],[20],[30],[40],[50],[60],[70],[80],[90],[100]],dtype=np.float64)
>>> x[:,:,:,0,0]=y
>>> print x[0,:,:,0,0]
[[   0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.    0.]
 [  10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.   10.]
 [  20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.   20.]
 [  30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.   30.]
 [  40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.   40.]
 [  50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.   50.]
 [  60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.   60.]
 [  70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.   70.]
 [  80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.   80.]
 [  90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.   90.]
 [ 100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.  100.]]

Of course in your real code, y probably isn't a literal, but a result of some earlier computation. (And even if it is a literal, you don't want to type all those extra brackets.) So, assume y is inherently a row vector, as we have to deal with it.

So, just reshape it on the fly:

>>> x = np.zeros((96,11,11,2,10),dtype=np.float64)
>>> y = np.array([0,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100],dtype=np.float64)
>>> x[:,:,:,0,0] = y.reshape((11, 1))

Same result.

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