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If so, why do we need sapply?

x <- list(a=1, b=1)
y <- list(a=1)
JSON <- rep(list(x,y),10000)
microbenchmark(sapply(JSON, function(x) x$a),
               unlist(lapply(JSON, function(x) x$a)),
               sapply(JSON, "[[", "a"),
               unlist(lapply(JSON, "[[", "a"))
               )

Unit: milliseconds
                                  expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
         sapply(JSON, function(x) x$a) 25.22623 28.55634 29.71373 31.76492 88.26514   100
 unlist(lapply(JSON, function(x) x$a)) 17.85278 20.25889 21.61575 22.67390 78.54801   100
               sapply(JSON, "[[", "a") 18.85529 20.06115 21.53790 23.42480 38.56610   100
       unlist(lapply(JSON, "[[", "a")) 11.33859 11.69198 12.25329 13.37008 27.81361   100
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probably because sapply call lapply. –  droopy Sep 12 '13 at 11:20
4  
We don't need sapply. It exists purely for convenience. –  Roland Sep 12 '13 at 11:30
    
Notice what happens with the names when unlist(list(a=1:2)); it's usually both faster (sometimes significantly so) and safer to unlist(..., use.names=FALSE). –  Martin Morgan Sep 12 '13 at 12:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In addition to running lapply, sapply runs simplify2array to try and fit the output into an array. To figure out if that is possible, the function needs to check if all the individual outputs have the same length: this is done via a costly unique(lapply(..., length)) which accounts for most of the time difference you were seeing:

b <- lapply(JSON, "[[", "a")

microbenchmark(lapply(JSON, "[[", "a"),
               unlist(b),
               unique(lapply(b, length)),
               sapply(JSON, "[[", "a"),
               sapply(JSON, "[[", "a", simplify = FALSE),
               unlist(lapply(JSON, "[[", "a"))
)

# Unit: microseconds
#                                       expr       min        lq   median        uq       max neval
#                    lapply(JSON, "[[", "a") 14809.151 15384.358 15774.26 16905.226 24944.863   100
#                                  unlist(b)   920.047  1043.719  1158.62  1223.091  8056.231   100
#                  unique(lapply(b, length)) 10778.065 11060.452 11456.11 12581.414 19717.740   100
#                    sapply(JSON, "[[", "a") 24827.206 25685.535 26656.88 30519.556 93195.751   100
#  sapply(JSON, "[[", "a", simplify = FALSE) 14283.541 14922.780 15526.42 16654.058 26865.022   100
#            unlist(lapply(JSON, "[[", "a")) 15334.026 16133.146 16607.12 18476.182 30080.544   100
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As droopy and Roland pointed out, sapply is a wrapper function for lapply designed for convenient use. sapply uses simplify2array which is slower than unlist:

> microbenchmark(unlist(as.list(1:1000)), simplify2array(as.list(1:1000)), times=1000)
Unit: microseconds
                            expr     min       lq  median       uq      max neval
         unlist(as.list(1:1000))  99.734 109.0230 113.912 118.3120 21343.92  1000
 simplify2array(as.list(1:1000)) 892.712 931.0895 947.957 976.3125 22241.52  1000

Also, when returning a matrix, sapply is slower than with other base functions, for example:

a <- list(c(1,2,3,4), c(1,2,3,4), c(1,2,3,4))
microbenchmark(t(do.call(rbind, lapply(a, function(x)x))), sapply(a, function(x)x))
Unit: microseconds
                                        expr    min     lq median     uq     max neval
 t(do.call(rbind, lapply(a, function(x) x))) 29.823 30.801 32.512 33.734  94.845   100
                    sapply(a, function(x) x) 57.201 58.179 59.156 60.134 111.956   100

But especially in the second case, sapply is much easier to use.

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