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I couldn't find any working python 3.3 mergesort codes, so i made 1 myself. Is there any way to speed it up? It sorts 20000 numbers in about 0.3-0.5 seconds

def msort(x):
    result = []
    if len(x) < 2:
        return x
    mid = int(len(x)/2)
    y = msort(x[:mid])
    z = msort(x[mid:])
    while (len(y) > 0) or (len(z) > 0):
        if len(y) > 0 and len(z) > 0:
            if y[0] > z[0]:
                result.append(z[0])
                z.pop(0)
            else:
                result.append(y[0])
                y.pop(0)
        elif len(z) > 0:
            for i in z:
                result.append(i)
                z.pop(0)
        else:
            for i in y:
                result.append(i)
                y.pop(0)
    return result
share|improve this question
3  
You should not pop from lists, as that will unecessarily shift the array elements over and over. You should avoid changing the list anyway when iterating over it. –  poke Sep 12 '13 at 10:33
1  
Also, there is probably nothing specific to Python 3.3 in an ordinary implementation of mergesort so you can just Google for "python mergesort" and use any implementation you find, even if it is for older versions. For instance, this one: geekviewpoint.com/python/sorting/mergesort –  Tamás Sep 12 '13 at 10:39

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can initialise the whole result list in the top level call to mergesort:

result = [0]*len(x)   # replace 0 with a suitable default element if necessary. 
                      # or just copy x (result = x[:])

Then for the recursive calls you can use a helper function to which you pass not sublists, but indices into x. And the bottom level calls read their values from x and write into result directly.

That way you can avoid all that poping and appending which should improve performance.

share|improve this answer

The first improvement would be to simplify the three cases in the main loop: Rather than iterating while some of the sequence has elements, iterate while both sequences have elements. When leaving the loop, one of them will be empty, we don't know which, but we don't care: We append them at the end of the result.

def msort2(x):
    if len(x) < 2:
        return x
    result = []          # moved!
    mid = int(len(x)/2)
    y = msort2(x[:mid])
    z = msort2(x[mid:])
    while (len(y) > 0) and (len(z) > 0):
            if y[0] > z[0]:
                result.append(z[0])
                z.pop(0)
            else:
                result.append(y[0])
                y.pop(0)
    result += y
    result += z
    return result

The second optimization is to avoid poping the elements. Rather, have two indices:

def msort3(x):
    result = []
    if len(x) < 2:
        return x
    mid = int(len(x)/2)
    y = msort3(x[:mid])
    z = msort3(x[mid:])
    i = 0
    j = 0
    while i < len(y) and j < len(z):
            if y[i] > z[j]:
                result.append(z[j])
                j += 1
            else:
                result.append(y[i])
                i += 1
    result += y[i:]
    result += z[j:]
    return result

A final improvement consists in using a non recursive algorithm to sort short sequences. In this case I use the built-in sorted function and use it when the size of the input is less than 20:

def msort4(x):
    result = []
    if len(x) < 20:
        return sorted(x)
    mid = int(len(x)/2)
    y = msort4(x[:mid])
    z = msort4(x[mid:])
    i = 0
    j = 0
    while i < len(y) and j < len(z):
            if y[i] > z[j]:
                result.append(z[j])
                j += 1
            else:
                result.append(y[i])
                i += 1
    result += y[i:]
    result += z[j:]
    return result

My measurements to sort a random list of 100000 integers are 2.46 seconds for the original version, 2.33 for msort2, 0.60 for msort3 and 0.40 for msort4. For reference, sorting all the list with sorted takes 0.03 seconds.

share|improve this answer
4  
Using sorted() feels like cheating. –  simonzack Oct 3 '14 at 5:21
    
I tried your msort3 method in python 2.7.6 but I got the following error - Traceback (most recent call last): File "mergesort.py", line 21, in <module> msort3([5,24, 87, 55, 32, 1, 45]); File "mergesort.py", line 6, in msort3 y = msort3(x[:mid]) File "mergesort.py", line 10, in msort3 while i < len(y) and j < len(z): TypeError: object of type 'NoneType' has no len() –  Abhishek Prakash Oct 14 '14 at 20:02
    
I tried the same msort3 method in python 3.4.0 and got the following error - [24, 87] Traceback (most recent call last): File "mergesort.py", line 21, in <module> msort3([5,24, 87, 55, 32, 1, 45]); File "mergesort.py", line 6, in msort3 y = msort3(x[:mid]) File "mergesort.py", line 10, in msort3 while i < len(y) and j < len(z): TypeError: object of type 'NoneType' has no len() –  Abhishek Prakash Oct 14 '14 at 20:15
    
@AbhishekPrakash: I cannot reproduce the error in Python 2.7.5. Will try latter on another machine. Are the return statements well written? –  anumi Oct 15 '14 at 6:20
    
Instead of return I tried print –  Abhishek Prakash Oct 15 '14 at 14:26

Loops like this can probably be speeded up:

for i in z:
    result.append(i)
    z.pop(0)

Instead, simply do this:

result.extend(z)

Note that there is no need to clean the contents of z because you won't use it anyway.

share|improve this answer

A longer one that counts inversions and adheres to the sorted interface. It's trivial to modify this to make it a method of an object that sorts in place.

import operator

class MergeSorted:

    def __init__(self):
        self.inversions = 0

    def __call__(self, l, key=None, reverse=False):

        self.inversions = 0

        if key is None:
            self.key = lambda x: x
        else:
            self.key = key

        if reverse:
            self.compare = operator.gt
        else:
            self.compare = operator.lt

        dest = list(l)
        working = [0] * len(l)
        self.inversions = self._merge_sort(dest, working, 0, len(dest))
        return dest

    def _merge_sort(self, dest, working, low, high):
        if low < high - 1:
            mid = (low + high) // 2
            x = self._merge_sort(dest, working, low, mid)
            y = self._merge_sort(dest, working, mid, high)
            z = self._merge(dest, working, low, mid, high)
            return (x + y + z)
        else:
            return 0

    def _merge(self, dest, working, low, mid, high):
        i = 0
        j = 0
        inversions = 0

        while (low + i < mid) and (mid + j < high):
            if self.compare(self.key(dest[low + i]), self.key(dest[mid + j])):
                working[low + i + j] = dest[low + i]
                i += 1
            else:
                working[low + i + j] = dest[mid + j]
                inversions += (mid - (low + i))
                j += 1

        while low + i < mid:
            working[low + i + j] = dest[low + i]
            i += 1

        while mid + j < high:
            working[low + i + j] = dest[mid + j]
            j += 1

        for k in range(low, high):
            dest[k] = working[k]

        return inversions


msorted = MergeSorted()

Uses

>>> l = [5, 2, 3, 1, 4]
>>> s = msorted(l)
>>> s
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> msorted.inversions
6

>>> l = ['e', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'd']
>>> d = {'a': 10,
...      'b': 4,
...      'c': 2,
...      'd': 5,
...      'e': 9}
>>> key = lambda x: d[x]
>>> s = msorted(l, key=key)
>>> s
['c', 'b', 'd', 'e', 'a']
>>> msorted.inversions
5

>>> l = [5, 2, 3, 1, 4]
>>> s = msorted(l, reverse=True)
>>> s
[5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
>>> msorted.inversions
4

>>> l = ['e', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'd']
>>> d = {'a': 10,
...      'b': 4,
...      'c': 2,
...      'd': 5,
...      'e': 9}
>>> key = lambda x: d[x]
>>> s = msorted(l, key=key, reverse=True)
>>> s
['a', 'e', 'd', 'b', 'c']
>>> msorted.inversions
5
share|improve this answer
def merge_sort(x):

    if len(x) < 2:return x

    result,mid = [],int(len(x)/2)

    y = merge_sort(x[:mid])
    z = merge_sort(x[mid:])

    while (len(y) > 0) and (len(z) > 0):
            if y[0] > z[0]:result.append(z.pop(0))   
            else:result.append(y.pop(0))

    result.extend(y+z)
    return result
share|improve this answer

As already said, l.pop(0) is a O(len(l)) operation and must be avoided, the above msort function is O(n**2). If efficiency matter, indexing is better but have cost too. The for x in l is faster but not easy to implement for mergesort : iter can be used instead here. Finally, checking i < len(l) is made twice because tested again when accessing the element : the exception mechanism (try except) is better and give a last improvement of 30% .

def msort(l):
    if len(l)>1:
        t=len(l)//2
        it1=iter(msort(l[:t]));x1=next(it1)
        it2=iter(msort(l[t:]));x2=next(it2)
        l=[]
        try:
            while True:
                if x1<=x2: l.append(x1);x1=next(it1)
                else     : l.append(x2);x2=next(it2)
        except:
            if x1<=x2: l.append(x2);l.extend(it2)
            else:      l.append(x1);l.extend(it1)
    return l
share|improve this answer

here is another solution

class MergeSort(object):
    def _merge(self,left, right):
        nl = len(left)
        nr = len(right)
        result = [0]*(nl+nr)
        i=0
        j=0
        for k in range(len(result)):
            if nl>i and nr>j:
                if left[i] <= right[j]:
                    result[k]=left[i]
                    i+=1
                else:
                    result[k]=right[j]
                    j+=1
            elif nl==i:
                result[k] = right[j]
                j+=1
            else: #nr>j:
                result[k] = left[i]
                i+=1
        return result

    def sort(self,arr):
        n = len(arr)
        if n<=1:
            return arr 
        left = self.sort(arr[:n/2])
        right = self.sort(arr[n/2:] )
        return self._merge(left, right)
def main():
    import random
    a= range(100000)
    random.shuffle(a)
    mr_clss = MergeSort()
    result = mr_clss.sort(a)
    #print result

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

and here is run time for list with 100000 elements:

real    0m1.073s
user    0m1.053s
sys         0m0.017s
share|improve this answer
def merge(l1, l2, out=[]):
    if l1==[]: return out+l2
    if l2==[]: return out+l1
    if l1[0]<l2[0]: return merge(l1[1:], l2, out+l1[0:1])
    return merge(l1, l2[1:], out+l2[0:1])
def merge_sort(l): return (lambda h: l if h<1 else merge(merge_sort(l[:h]), merge_sort(l[h:])))(len(l)/2)
print(merge_sort([1,4,6,3,2,5,78,4,2,1,4,6,8]))
share|improve this answer

Take my implementation

def merge_sort(sequence):
    if len(sequence) < 2:
        return sequence
    m = len(sequence) / 2
    return merge(merge_sort(sequence[:m]), merge_sort(sequence[m:]))


def merge(left, right):
    result = []
    i = j = 0
    while i < len(left) and j < len(right):
        if left[i] < right[j]:
            result.append(left[i])
            i += 1
        else:
            result.append(right[j])
            j += 1
    result += left[i:]
    result += right[j:]

    return result


print merge_sort([5, 2, 6, 8, 5, 8, 1])
share|improve this answer

Try this recursive version

def mergeList(l1,l2):
    l3=[]
    Tlen=len(l1)+len(l2)
    inf= float("inf")
    for i in range(Tlen):
        print   "l1= ",l1[0]," l2= ",l2[0]
        if l1[0]<=l2[0]:
            l3.append(l1[0])
            del l1[0]
            l1.append(inf)
        else:
            l3.append(l2[0])
            del l2[0]
            l2.append(inf)
    return l3

def main():
    l1=[2,10,7,6,8]
    print mergeSort(breaklist(l1))

def breaklist(rawlist):
    newlist=[]
    for atom in rawlist:
        print atom
        list_atom=[atom]
        newlist.append(list_atom)
    return newlist

def mergeSort(inputList):
    listlen=len(inputList)
    if listlen ==1:
        return inputList
    else:
        newlist=[]
        if listlen % 2==0:
            for i in range(listlen/2):
                newlist.append(mergeList(inputList[2*i],inputList[2*i+1]))
        else:
            for i in range((listlen+1)/2):
                if 2*i+1<listlen:
                    newlist.append(mergeList(inputList[2*i],inputList[2*i+1]))
                else:
                    newlist.append(inputList[2*i])
        return  mergeSort(newlist)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
Implying mine is not... –  Hans Dec 8 '14 at 16:31

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