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The general problem: Iterate through a windows folder structure, without the use of Find::File and rename all folders to be some short value. This is intended to fix the classic "windows file paths are more then 256 characters" problem.

My problem: I've got everything working, except that it will correctly process a single path through the tree, but not any others and I can't see why.

Note: use File:Find is still present, though not used, and the code is likely in-elegant. It renames the current folder, then iterates through subfolders.

Code:

use strict;
use File::Find;
use File::Copy;
use File::Path;

my $target = "E:\\bl10s\\";

opendir( DIR, $target );
my $newFolderName = 0;

my $file;

while ( $file = readdir(DIR) ) {

    # A file test to check that it is a directory
    # Use -f to test for a file
    next if ( $file eq "." );
    next if ( $file eq ".." );
    next if ( -f "$target\\$file" );

    print "$target/$file" . "\n";

    while ( -e $target . $newFolderName ) {
        $newFolderName++;
    }

    print $target. $file . " rename to " . $target . $newFolderName . "\n";

    rename( $target . $file, $target . $newFolderName );

}

closedir(DIR);
opendir( DIR, $target );

while ( $file = readdir(DIR) ) {
    next if ( $file eq "." );
    next if ( $file eq ".." );
     if ( -f "$target\\$file" )
    {
        print "Failed name check on itterator main line \n";
    }
    my $nextDirectoryPathCalled = $target . $file;
    print "Re-iterating on:   " . $nextDirectoryPathCalled;
    my $someint = &stripper($nextDirectoryPathCalled);
}
closedir(DIR);

# find( \&dir_names, $target );

sub stripper {
    print "\nNew level\n";
    print "$_[0] . \n";



        my $target = $_[0] . "\\";

        opendir( DIR, $target );
        my $newFolderName = 0;

        my $file;

        while ( $file = readdir(DIR) ) {

            # A file test to check that it is a directory
            # Use -f to test for a file
            next if ( $file eq "." );
            next if ( $file eq ".." );
            next if ( -f "$target\\$file" );

            print "TARGET:  $target       FILE:  $file" . "\n";

            while ( -e $target . $newFolderName ) {
                $newFolderName++;
            }

            print $target
              . $file
              . " rename to "
              . $target
              . $newFolderName . "\n";

            rename( $target . $file, $target . $newFolderName );

        }

        closedir(DIR);




        opendir( DIR, $target );

        while ( $file = readdir(DIR) ) {
            next if ( $file eq "." );
            next if ( $file eq ".." );
            next if ( -f "$target\\$file" );

            my $nextDirectoryPathCalled = $target . $file;
            print "Re-iterating on:   " . $nextDirectoryPathCalled;
            &stripper($nextDirectoryPathCalled);

        }
        closedir(DIR);



}

Any ideas? Feel free to be critical...

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you want to use File::Find? You even imported it…. You are running into problems because you use a global dirhandle – opendir my $dir, ... instead. You have no error handling. There is lots of repeated code, and signs of cargo-culting. –  amon Sep 12 '13 at 10:57
    
Yes, please explain why you don't want to use File::Find. It is fully functional and debugged. If you are trying to learn a little Perl, then I suggest you don't do it with real work on a live file structure. For your purposes I suggest you use the short filename (8.3 filename) for the path segments. These apply at the same time as the long filename, as long as SFN support has been enabled on your installation. –  Borodin Sep 12 '13 at 11:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When doing recursion, it is important that each level has its own set of variables, and does not change those of upper levels. Take for example this implementation of the factorial, which is:

fac(n) = 1 · 2 · 3 · … · n

In naïve Perl code, we could write

sub fac {
  $n = shift;
  return 1 if $n < 2;
  return $n * fac($n-1);
}

Output for fac(10) is 1. This is cleary wrong, we expected 1*2*3*4*5*6*7*8*9*10 = 3628800.

The problem is that each recursion level assigned to the same $n variable. We have the following call stack:

fac(10)
  $n = 10
fac(9) * $n
  $n = 9
fac(8) * $n * $n
  $n = 8
...
fac(1) * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n * $n
  $n = 1
  return 1

So all of that evaluates to 1. Duh.

We can give each level a different $n variable by declaring it with my:

sub fac {
  my $n = shift;
  return 1 if $n < 2;
  return $n * fac($n-1);
}

Now, everything works as expected.


In Perl, bareword filehandles are global variables. When you do

opendir DIR, $somepath;

then you assign a handle to that global bareword. While recursing, you constantly reassign to it. When your function returns from a lower level, the handle does not get the previous value back.

Instead, you should use lexical variables for your handles as well:

opendir my $dir, $somepath;

Then each invocation of your subroutine has its own, non-global dirhandle, and everything should work as expected.


Using File::Find handles all of that complexity behind the scenes, and just makes the correct element directly available to your callback. It is robust, widely used, so you should really see if you shouldn't be using the find function from that module instead.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason not to use File::Find - it fails the moment it hits the 256 character windows limit. At which point it falls over without grace. No way to stop it that I've found. –  user2702772 Sep 12 '13 at 11:28
1  
@user2702772 Why do you think it "falls over without grace"? That might be the correct conclusion, but we don't know that. Give us facts. –  TLP Sep 12 '13 at 11:35
1  
Definition of fails without grace: "Can't cd to .. from E:\my_very_long_file_path_more_then_256_long at C:/Perl64/lib/File/Find.pm line 803." –  user2702772 Sep 12 '13 at 11:44
    
Quick hack for the File::Find problem: can you use the no_chdir option? –  Slaven Rezic Sep 12 '13 at 12:02
    
Nope, not an option for this - or I certainly can't see how that would be enough. –  user2702772 Sep 12 '13 at 13:31

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