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I have a file that looks like this:

....
....
....
MY_TAG=Release_X_Y
....
....

The fourth line always looks like this and contains numbers. E.g. Release_1_1

The value I will have is an argument passed by a user which will look like this:

1_2_3 

Where 1, 2, 3 will always be seperated by underscores but will be changing numbers.

I need to take those first two numbers i.e. 1 and 2 and use them to replace the line MY_TAG in my text file. Is it possible to do this with sed or awk?

To summarise:

Pre-existing file

....
MY_TAG=Release_1_2  <---Line 4
....

User passes argument to my script and its stored as a variable:

User arg = 4_9_2

I want to modify the file mentioned above to be:

....
MY_TAG=Release_4_9
....
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash
RELEASE=${1%_*}  # Trim the last _X from the release number
sed -e "s/^MY_TAG=Release_[0-9_]*/MY_TAG=Release_$RELEASE/" -i file_path
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Hey, thanks for the response. I had to modify it slightly because the version of sed I have available doesn't support -i. Doing the job nicely, cheers. –  user1197252 Sep 24 '13 at 9:30

try this one-liner:

 awk -v arg="4_9_2" 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="=";sub(/_[^_]*$/,"",arg)}NR==4{$2="Release_"arg}7' file

the arg="4_9_2" could be arg="$var", which $var is a shall variable, passed in by user input.

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It's possible in awk, but IMHO sed is a better match here.

Step one is to isolate the line you operate on. This can indeed be done by line number (sed address 4). Or you might want to use something more robust in case the input file format is likely to evolve, e.g. a regex.

There you want to replace "Release_1_2" with "Release_4_9". A regex substitution is perfect for the job: s/Release_.*/Release_4_9/.

A full working command should then be: sed -e "4 s/Release_.*/Release_4_9/". Supposing your target release number is in shell variable RELEASE, you'd interpolate it this way: sed -e "4 s/Release_.*/Release_$RELEASE/".

This invocation is a filter: it takes your file on standard input (or as a command-line argument) and prints the result. To have it modify the file in-place, with recent GNU versions of sed, use the -i option:

RELEASE=4_9
sed -e "4 s/Release_.*/Release_$RELEASE/" -i file
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You can have a script like this:

#!/bin/bash
FILE=$1
ARG=$2
[[ -e $FILE && $ARG =~ ^[^_]+_[^_]+ ]] && sed -i "/^MY_TAG=/{ s|^\(MY_TAG=[^_]*\).*|\1_${BASH_REMATCH[0]}|; }" "$FILE"  

Example:

bash script.sh file 1_4_5

Output:

...
...
...
MY_TAG=Release_1_4
...
...
...
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