Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently working on creating a new C# project that needs to interact with an older C++ application. There is an error enumeration that already exists in the C++ app that I need to use in the C# app.

I don't want to just re declare the enumeration in C# because that could cause sync issues down the line if the files aren't updated together.

All that being said my question is this: Is there a way for me to taken an enumeration declared like so:

typedef enum
{
    eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL = 0x10001
    ...
} eDeviceIntErrCodes;

and use it in a C# program like so:

eDeviceIntErrCodes.eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Check out the PInvoke Interop Assistant tool http://www.codeplex.com/clrinterop/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseId=14120. Its a useful tool for generating PInvoke signatures for native methods.

If I feed it your enum it generates this code. There is a command line version of the tool included so you could potentially build an automated process to keep the C# definition of the enum up to date whenever the C++ version changes.


    public enum eDeviceIntErrCodes 
    {
        /// eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL -> 0x10001
        eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL = 65537,
    }
share|improve this answer

In C/C++ you can #include a .cs file which contains the enumeration definition. Careful use of preprocessor directives takes care of the syntax differences between C# and C.

Example:

#if CSharp
namespace MyNamespace.SharedEnumerations
{
public
#endif


enum MyFirstEnumeration
{
    Autodetect = -1,
    Windows2000,
    WindowsXP,
    WindowsVista,
    OSX,
    Linux,

    // Count must be last entry - is used to determine number of items in the enum
    Count
};
#if CSharp
public 
#endif

enum MessageLevel
{
    None,           // Message is ignored
    InfoMessage,    // Message is written to info port.
    InfoWarning,    // Message is written to info port and warning is issued
    Popup           // User is alerted to the message
};

#if CSharp
    public delegate void MessageEventHandler(MessageLevel level, string message);
}
#endif

In your C# project, set a conditional compilation symbol "CSharp", make sure no such preprocessor definition exists in the C/C++ build environment.

Note that this will only ensure both parts are syncronised at build time. If you mix-and-match binaries from different builds, the guarantee fails.

share|improve this answer

Simple answer is going to be no. Sorry, you are going to have to re-declare.

I have, in the past however, written scripts to import my C++ enums to a C# format in a enums.cs file and run it as part of the build, that way everything syncs.

share|improve this answer

If you had declared the enum like:

namespace blah
{
    enum DEVICE_ERR_CODES
    {
        eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL = 0x10001,
        eDEVICEINT_ERR_OTHER = 0x10002,
    };
}

and in another file:

DEVICE_ERR_CODES eDeviceIntErrCodes;

and named the enum file with a .cs extension, you might be able to get it to work. You'd reference it like:

DEVICE_ERR_CODES err = DEVICE_ERR_CODES.eDEVICEINT_ERR_FATAL;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.