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Following code is my first C++11 attempt at pretty printing iterable containers. It uses the function template default parameter feature.

#include <ostream>
#include <string>
#include <utility>

template <typename T>
void print(std::ostream &o, T const &t) { o<< t; }

void print(std::ostream &o, std::string const &s){ o<< '"'<< s<< '"'; }

template <typename K, typename V>
void print(std::ostream &o, std::pair<K, V> const &p)
{
  o<< '{'; print(o, p.first);
  o<< ": "; print(o, p.second);
  o<< '}';
}

template <typename C, typename I= typename C::const_iterator>
std::ostream &operator<< (std::ostream &o, C const &c)
{
  o<< '[';
  if(c.empty()) return o<< ']';
  I b= c.begin(), e= c.end(); -- e;
  for(; b!= e; ++ b)
  {
    print(o, *b);
    o<< ", ";
  }
  print(o, *b);
  return o<< ']';
}

It works fine on containers, container of containers etc. With one exception:

std::cout<< std::string("wtf");

Compilation with g++4.7/8 breaks saying ambiguous operator<<.

Is there any fix for this code to avoid the ambiguity?

share|improve this question
    
Since std::string has a const_iterator, your operator<< template is a match. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 12 '13 at 13:37
    
@VaughnCato yes, I'd like std::basic_string<char, allocator> overload to be preferred if possible. –  nurettin Sep 12 '13 at 13:38
    
You could use an enable_if to disable your overload when C is a string. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 12 '13 at 13:43
    
OT, but you may use auto b = c.begin() instead of I b –  Jarod42 Sep 12 '13 at 13:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use std::enable_if to disable your overload in the case of a string:

template <typename C, typename I= typename C::const_iterator>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<C,std::string>::value,std::ostream>::type &
  operator<< (std::ostream &o, C const &c)
{
  o<< '[';
  if(c.empty()) return o<< ']';
  I b= c.begin(), e= c.end(); -- e;
  for(; b!= e; ++ b)
  {
    print(o, *b);
    o<< ", ";
  }
  print(o, *b);
  return o<< ']';
}

or to do it more generically:

template <typename T>
struct is_string : std::false_type {};

template <typename Char,typename Allocator>
struct is_string<std::basic_string<Char,Allocator> > : std::true_type {};

template <typename C, typename I= typename C::const_iterator>
typename std::enable_if<!is_string<C>::value,std::ostream>::type &
  operator<< (std::ostream &o, C const &c)
{
  o<< '[';
  if(c.empty()) return o<< ']';
  I b= c.begin(), e= c.end(); -- e;
  for(; b!= e; ++ b)
  {
    print(o, *b);
    o<< ", ";
  }
  print(o, *b);
  return o<< ']';
}
share|improve this answer
    
good call, I wanted to do it without enable_ifs (hence default parameter) but you gave the correct answer anyway. –  nurettin Sep 12 '13 at 13:58

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