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I am passing 3 parameters into my stored procedure: @Time, @DeptID, @Value.

  1. @Time is representing: 1=past 24hours, 2=past week, 3=past month, 4=past year
  2. @DeptID is the ID of the various departments
  3. @Value 1=Sort by Low, 2=Sort by High

Here is my current code:

DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @SQL = ('SELECT S.ID, S.[Description], D.Department, S.Value, S.[Date] FROM Suggestions S INNER JOIN Department D ON D.ID = S.DeptID WHERE Approved =1')

IF (@DeptID = 0 AND @Value = 0 AND @Time = 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @SQL = (@SQL +' ORDER BY [Date] DESC')
    END

IF (@Time > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = (CASE WHEN @Time = 1 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -1, GETDATE()) ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC')
             WHEN @Time = 2 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -7, GETDATE()) ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC' )
             WHEN @Time = 3 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -30, GETDATE()) ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC')
             WHEN @Time = 4 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -365, GETDATE()) ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC') END)
   END

IF (@DeptID > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = @SQL + ' AND S.DeptID = @DeptID ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC')
   END

IF (@Value > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = (CASE WHEN @Value = 1 THEN (@SQL + ' ORDER BY S.Value DESC')
             WHEN @Value = 2 THEN (@SQL + ' ORDER BY S.Value ASC')

This is fine when only one parameter is passed in, but when trying to filter by two or more parameters then I run into a problem... So far I have been getting errors because I am adding 2 'Order By' clause onto the end of my Statement:

ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC ORDER BY S.Value DESC

Can anyone point me in the right direction with this? Any help at all would be much appriciated

share|improve this question
    
create a temp table to store the end result in it. then use if else or switch to execute queries depending on your parameter values. I can give further info if this is what you want to do.hope this helps –  hima Sep 12 '13 at 14:09
    
I think @Lamak code would be a better solution to what you are trying to achieve –  Sonam Sep 12 '13 at 14:22
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I rewrote your code to not use dynamic SQL:

SELECT  S.ID, 
        S.[Description], 
        D.Department, 
        S.Value, 
        S.[Date] 
FROM Suggestions S 
INNER JOIN Department D 
    ON D.ID = S.DeptID 
WHERE Approved =1
AND (@Time = 0 
     OR (@Time = 1 AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -1, GETDATE()))
     OR (@Time = 2 AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -30, GETDATE()))
     OR (@Time = 3 AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -365, GETDATE()))
    )
AND (@DeptID = 0
     OR (@DeptID > 0 AND S.DeptID = @DeptID)
    )
ORDER BY [Date] DESC,
         CASE WHEN @Value = 1 THEN S.Value
         ELSE 1 END DESC,
         CASE WHEN @Value = 2 THEN S.Value
         ELSE 1 END ASC

Updated with dynamic SQL version

Ok, if you want the dynamic SQL solution, then this is one way (but first, did you read this link?):

DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(MAX), @WHERE VARCHAR(MAX), @ORDER VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @SQL = ('SELECT S.ID, S.[Description], D.Department, S.Value, S.[Date] FROM Suggestions S INNER JOIN Department D ON D.ID = S.DeptID WHERE Approved =1')

SET @WHERE = ' AND ' + 
             CASE WHEN @Time = 0 THEN '1 = 1'
             WHEN @Time = 1 THEN '[Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -1, GETDATE())'
             WHEN @Time = 2 THEN '[Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -7, GETDATE())'
             WHEN @Time = 3 THEN '[Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -30, GETDATE())'
             WHEN @Time = 4 THEN '[Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -365, GETDATE())' END

SET @WHERE = @WHERE + 
             CASE WHEN @DeptID > 0 THEN ' AND S.DeptID = @DeptID'
             ELSE '' END

SET @ORDER = ' ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC' + 
             CASE WHEN @Value = 0 THEN ''
             WHEN @Value = 1 THEN ', S.Value DESC'           
             WHEN @Value = 2 THEN ', S.Value ASC' END

SET @SQL = @SQL + @WHERE + @ORDER

PRINT @SQL
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Lamak, the only problem with this is that the code I posted is a condensed version of my actual stored procedure. So I need it to be dynamic or it might end up being quite a long cumbersome piece of code –  TreasaNGC Sep 12 '13 at 14:25
    
@TreasaNGC updated my answer –  Lamak Sep 12 '13 at 14:43
    
+1 but keep in mind that in a lot of cases you might be better off with the dynamic SQL version, since the ORDER can definitely impact the chosen plan, and the chosen plan might not be efficient for all variations of the ordering. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 12 '13 at 15:27
    
@AaronBertrand duly noted –  Lamak Sep 12 '13 at 15:29
    
Thank you @Lamak, your answer was just what I needed :) –  TreasaNGC Sep 12 '13 at 15:36
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Not sure I agree with all of your dynamic SQL but why not just check if the order by clause is already in the SQL String and if it is just add the additional parameter otherwise add the entire clause. You can do this using CharIndex.

I would also suggest only adding the DESC at the very end just before you execute the @SQL

IF (@DeptID = 0 AND @Value = 0 AND @Time = 0)
BEGIN
    IF CHARINDEX('ORDER BY',@SQL) = 0
    BEGIN
      SET @SQL = (@SQL +' ORDER BY [Date] ')
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
      SET @SQL = (@SQL +',[Date] ')
    END
END

SET @SQL = @SQL + ' DESC'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help @Armitage, CHARINDEX() was helpful. –  TreasaNGC Sep 12 '13 at 15:55
    
I tried to vote up your answer but I do not have enough reputation yet, sorry :/ –  TreasaNGC Sep 12 '13 at 15:57
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DECLARE @STARTDATE datetime = CASE @Time 
                    WHEN 1 THEN DATEADD(dd, -1, GETDATE())
                    WHEN 2 THEN DATEADD(ww, -1, GETDATE())
                    WHEN 3 THEN DATEADD(mm, -1, GETDATE())
                    WHEN 4 THEN DATEADD(yy, -1, GETDATE())
                END

SELECT  S.ID, 
        S.[Description], 
        D.Department, 
        S.Value, 
        S.[Date] 
FROM    Suggestions S INNER JOIN Department D ON D.ID = S.DeptID 
WHERE   Approved = 1 AND
        (S.DeptID = @DeptId OR @DeptID = 0) AND
        [DATEADD] >= @STARTDATE
ORDER BY case @Value when 0 then [Date] else 0 end,
        case @Value when 1 then S.Value else S.Value * -1 end
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't use lazy shorthands like dd and ww. If you mean DAY, then type DAY. Why shouldn't you use shorthands? Let me know if you guess the correct results for both of these values (and please quiz your colleagues, too): SELECT DATEADD(Y, 1, GETDATE()), DATEPART(W, GETDATE()); Much better to be explicit and completely unambiguous. Also see sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2011/09/20/… –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 12 '13 at 15:30
    
I don't think those 'lazy' shorthands are ambiguous, and I'd rather see DATEADD(yy, -1, GETDATE()) than DATEADD(DAY, -365, GETDATE()) . –  paul Sep 12 '13 at 15:49
    
You don't think Y is ambiguous? Did you try it? Did it return the result you expect? Also I wasn't suggesting the replacement you suggested (which wouldn't work in a leap year). I suggested simply changing YY to YEAR. What advantage do you get for using YY instead of YEAR? Saving two keystrokes? At what cost? It's about readability and promoting best practices. You may have memorized all of the shorthands and know which ones are misleading, but not all of your readers have. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 12 '13 at 15:52
    
Hopefully my readers just see four DATEADD statements in a row and assume that dd, ww, mm, yy refer to days, weeks, months and years without giving it too much thought. I agree that W/WW and Y/YY could be disasters waiting to happen in a different context, but here, as read, I think it's pretty clear whats going on. –  paul Sep 12 '13 at 16:09
    
I think you're failing to see the bigger picture, and inexplicably ignoring my question: what do you gain by being terse and ambiguous? Remember that when you post a "solution" on the Internet, other users may learn from it... in this case bad habits. It's not just about what you're presenting in the context of this specific question. shrug –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 12 '13 at 16:14
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it looks like the criteria for your last two if statements are being met and you're adding your order clause twice.

Try this:

DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @SQL = ('SELECT S.ID, S.[Description], D.Department, S.Value, S.[Date] FROM Suggestions S INNER JOIN Department D ON D.ID = S.DeptID WHERE Approved =1')

IF (@DeptID = 0 AND @Value = 0 AND @Time = 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @SQL = (@SQL +' ORDER BY [Date] DESC')
    END

IF (@Time > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = (CASE WHEN @Time = 1 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -1, GETDATE()) ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC')
             WHEN @Time = 2 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -7, GETDATE())' )
             WHEN @Time = 3 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -30, GETDATE())')
             WHEN @Time = 4 THEN (@SQL + ' AND [Date] >= DATEADD(DAY, -365,GETDATE())') END)
   END

IF (@DeptID > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = @SQL + ' AND S.DeptID = @DeptID')
   END

IF (@Value > 0)
   BEGIN
    SET @SQL = (CASE WHEN @Value = 1 THEN (@SQL + '  ORDER BY S.[Date] DESC, S.Value DESC')
             WHEN @Value = 2 THEN (@SQL + ' ORDER BY S.[Date] ASC, S.Value ASC')
share|improve this answer
    
I scrolled over and saw the order clauses in the first 'IF' statement too. I edited to code I pasted to take them out. –  Jared_S Sep 12 '13 at 14:43
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