Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a load of data in a CSV file which gets read by Java (using OpenCSV). What I want is for each time the method accesses the file for it to read the next line.

Imagine file.csv looks like:

1,1,1,1,
2,2,2,2,

and my class looks like:

public class Stuff
    private static int count = 0;

    public int getFromFile(){
        CSVReader reader = new CSVReader(new FileReader("file.csv"));
        List<String[]> rows = reader.readAll();
        reader.close();
        System.out.println(rows.get(count)[0]);
        count++;
    }
}

The output of this if run twice would be:

1
2

Now, that all works, however it's difficult to properly unit test because the use of the static count variable makes which line the method reads in any one test dependent on the order the tests are run in. Plus it generally strikes me as pretty ropey design.

So, is there a better way of reading subsequent lines of a file in subsequent method invocations in a good, testable way? I know people are generally pretty against using static fields where they're avoidable, so is it avoidable here?

share|improve this question
2  
Is there a reason you can't read in the whole file and just access the data one line at a time? That seems like the cleanest solution to me. –  thegrinner Sep 12 '13 at 14:28
    
What exactly are you asking? Do you have an issue or want a new method idea? –  TheNickmaster21 Sep 12 '13 at 14:30
    
I've edited my post to make the question clearer. I'm just wondering if there's a way of accessing subsequent lines of a file in different method invocations that avoids the untestability of using a static counter field. –  Tim Barclay Sep 12 '13 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

@thegrinner is correct in his comment - but to elaborate...

public class Stuff {
    private static int count = -1;
    private static List<String[] rows>;

    public int getNextLine(){
        if (rows == null) {
            CSVReader reader = new CSVReader(new FileReader("file.csv"));
            List<String[]> rows = reader.readAll();
            reader.close();
        }
        count++;
        return rows.get(count)[0];
    }
}

This isn't tested... but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
You and @thegrinner are right, it does make more sense to read the whole file and then access it one line at a time. But this solution still leaves the same problem of having the static count field making it difficult to test, which was the real problem (although I may not have made that clear in my post). –  Tim Barclay Sep 12 '13 at 15:16

The reason you are having unit testing your code is because it is pretty terrible. Automated unit tests tend to lead to highly cohesive and loosely coupled code. In your short method you are really doing two things reading the file and managing the way you handle the lines in memory.

These are two separate actions. Break this into two methods and then you will find it much easier to test.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, you're right, but that's not what makes the unit testing difficult; it's the use of the static count field meaning the line of the file each test will access is unpredictable. I should have clarified that that was the point of the question so I'll edit the post. –  Tim Barclay Sep 12 '13 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.