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I have encountered this problem earlier today. This is my first network application.

server.py

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import socket

s = socket.socket()
host = socket.gethostname()

# Reserve a port for your service.
port = 12345
# Bind to the port
s.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
s.bind((host, port))

# Now wait for client connection.
s.listen(1)
conn, addr = s.accept()
try:
    while True:
        # connection, address
        content = conn.recv(1024)
        if content in ('status', 'stop', 'start', 'reload', 'restart'):
            conn.send('%s received' % content)
        else:
            conn.send('Invalid command')
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    conn.close()
    s.shutdown(socket.SHUT_RDWR)
    s.close()

client.py

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import socket

s = socket.socket()
host = socket.gethostname()
port = 12345

s.connect((host, port))
try:
    while True:
        print ''
        value = raw_input('Enter a command:\n')
        if value != '':
            s.send(value)
            print s.recv(1024)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    s.shutdown(socket.SHUT_RDWR)
    s.close()

It is a very basic client/server application. The server starts up, and wait for the client to send commands. The client connects to the server, asks the user to type a command. Commands are then sent to the server which replies <command> received or Invalid command. The code was running fine, until I hit CTRL+C. The server crashed. Why is that ?

Example:

python client.py 

Enter a command:
stop
stop received

Enter a command:
status
status received

Enter a command:
bla
Invalid command

Enter a command:
^C

On the server side:

python server.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "server.py", line 25, in <module>
    conn.send('Invalid command')
socket.error: [Errno 32] Broken pipe
share|improve this question
    
Did you know that socket.send is not guaranteed to send the entire string you pass to it? –  Jean-Paul Calderone Sep 12 '13 at 15:14
    
Since I am reading only 1024 bytes? If so, yes I know, but I am only reading a few characters, so it doesn't really matter –  Paco Sep 12 '13 at 15:20
    
It doesn't matter if you don't care if your application is reliable. :) Many routers can and will fragment 1024 bytes (or less) of TCP traffic into multiple IP datagrams. Plus there's the other bug, which is that your protocol has no framing: nothing stops your server from accidentally getting "statusstop" as the result of a single read. You might want to read xml.com/pub/au/215 to learn more! –  Jean-Paul Calderone Sep 12 '13 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Put your accept in a while loop, too. Something like:

while True:
    conn, addr = s.accept()
    while True:
        content = conn.recv(1024)
        if not content:
            break
        if content in ('status', 'stop', 'start', 'reload', 'restart'):
            conn.send('%s received' % content)
        else:
            conn.send('Invalid command')
    conn.close()

Also note recv returns empty string when the client closes the connection, hence the if not content: break.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is that better than a try/except statement? Can you be more specific? Otherwise, thanks for the answer –  Paco Sep 12 '13 at 15:19
    
Smoother code flow. Non-repetitive (accepting in two places). Clearer intent. Make a connection, receive data until client closes, close connection and repeat. –  Mark Tolonen Sep 12 '13 at 15:28
    
The part I didn't get was: if content is '', then it means the client shut the connection. Thanks –  Paco Sep 12 '13 at 15:49
    
Read the socket.recv documentation. For a synchronous connection, recv will wait until at least one byte of data is ready, but will return zero bytes (an empty string) if the client closes the connection. –  Mark Tolonen Sep 12 '13 at 16:10
    
Thanks a lot, this helped me a lot –  Paco Sep 12 '13 at 16:25

Basically, I wasn't recreating a new connection on my server for new future clients, and then, when it was hitting the line conn.send('Invalid command'), it was crashing. To solve this:

I just replaced:

conn.send('Invalid command')

with:

try:
    conn.send('Invalid command')
except socket.error:
    conn, addr = s.accept()
share|improve this answer

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