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While searching for an answer to this question, I've run into similar ones utilizing LINQ but I haven't been able to fully understand them (and thus, implement them), as I'm not familiarized with it. What I would like to, basically, is this:

  1. Check if any element of a list contains a specific string.
  2. If it does, get that element.

I honestly don't know how I would go about doing that. What I can come up with is this (not working, of course):

if (myList.Contains(myString))
    string element = myList.ElementAt(myList.IndexOf(myString));

I know WHY it does not work:

  • myList.Contains() does not return true, since it will check for if a whole element of the list matches the string I specified.
  • myList.IndexOf() will not find an occurrence, since, as it is the case again, it will check for an element matching the string.

Still, I have no clue how to solve this problem, but I figure I'll have to use LINQ as suggested in similar questions to mine. That being said, if that's the case here, I'd like for the answerer to explain to me the use of LINQ in their example (as I said, I haven't bothered with it in my time with C#). Thank you in advance guys (and gals?).

EDIT: I have come up with a solution; just loop through the list, check if current element contains the string and then set a string equal to the current element. I'm wondering, though, is there a more efficient way than this?

string myString = "bla";
string element = "";

for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count; i++)
{
    if (myList[i].Contains(myString))
        element = myList[i];
}
share|improve this question
    
as I mention in my answer, old fashion loops (like you have as your question) are almost always fastest. But you could perf test it if you care enough. –  McKay Sep 12 '13 at 14:46
    
There could be multiple strings in your list containing your string myString, in your current loop, you will get the last element. It depends on you if you want to find the first or last, if you just want to find the first, then break the loop after finding the item. –  Habib Sep 12 '13 at 14:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You should be able to use Linq here:

var matchingvalues = myList
    .Where(stringToCheck => stringToCheck.Contains(myString));

If you simply wish to return the first matching item:

var match = myList
    .FirstOrDefault(stringToCheck => stringToCheck.Contains(myString));

if(match != null)
    //Do stuff
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Or replace Where with FirstOrDefault in your second case myList.FirstOrDefault(stringToCheck => stringToCheck.Contains(myString)) –  Habib Sep 12 '13 at 14:46
    
@Habib Good call! –  Dave Bish Sep 12 '13 at 14:47
    
Great answer. Just out of curiosity, though: why is it that matching is compiler-determined (var)? Since I know that my list is of type String, would it be safe to use string matching in this case? –  Jim Iliadis Sep 12 '13 at 14:49
1  
Not really sure why this answer has been downvoted. –  Habib Sep 12 '13 at 14:51
1  
@JimIliadis "var" and "string" mean exactly the same thing in this case - the compiler is smart enough to know that the result can only be 'string'. var is really just a coding style thing (when not using anonymous types) –  Dave Bish Sep 12 '13 at 14:53

The basic answer is You need to iterate through loop and check any element contains the specified string. So, Lets say code is

foreach(string item in myList)
{
  if(item.Contains(myString))
       return item;
}

The equivalent but terse code is

mylist.Where(x => x.Contains(myString)).FirstOrDefault();

Here, x is parameter that acts like item in above code.

share|improve this answer
string result = myList.FirstOrDefault(x => x == myString)
if(result != null)
{
  //found
}
share|improve this answer
for (int i = 0; i < myList.Length; i++)
{
    if (myList[i].Contains(myString)) // (you use the word "contains". either equals or indexof might be appropriate)
    {
        return i;
    }
}

Old fashion loops are almost always the fastest.

share|improve this answer
    
Since I go for efficiency, are you suggesting that this method is faster (thus, more efficient)? –  Jim Iliadis Sep 12 '13 at 14:54
1  
I haven't perf tested it, but I'd guess that this would be faster. Only ever requires one pass through the list, until it finds something and breaks out early (like the Linq options might do if written well), doesn't have the method invocation overhead of linq, or the lambda overhead of linq either. Not that those are huge causes of concern, but can cause some performance hit. –  McKay Sep 12 '13 at 14:56

You could use Linq's FirstOrDefault extension method:

string element = myList.FirstOrDefault(s => s.Contains(myString));

This will return the fist element that contains the substring myString, or null if no such element is found.

If all you need is the index, use the List<T> class's FindIndex method:

int index = myList.FindIndex(s => s.Contains(myString));

This will return the the index of fist element that contains the substring myString, or -1 if no such element is found.

share|improve this answer

If you want a list of string containing yor string:

var newList = myList.Where(x => x.Contains(myString)).ToList();

For the first

var element = myList.Where(x => x.Contains(myString)).FirstOrDefault();

Keep in mid that Contains method is case sensitive.

share|improve this answer

you can use

var match=myList.Where(item=>item.Contains("Required String"));
foreach(var i in match)
{
//do something with the matched items
}

LINQ provides you with capabilities to "query" any collection of data. You can use syntax like a database query (select, where, etc) on a collection (here the collection (list) of strings).

so you are doing like "get me items from the list Where it satisfies a given condition"

inside the Where you are using a "lambda expression"

to tell briefly lambda expression is something like (input parameter => return value)

so for a parameter "item", it returns "item.Contains("required string")" . So it returns true if the item contains the string and thereby it gets selected from the list since it satisfied the condition.

share|improve this answer

To keep it simple use this;

foreach(string item in myList)//Iterate through each item.
{
 if(item.Contains("Search Term")//True if the item contains search pattern.
 {
   return item;//Return the matched item.
 }
}

Alternatively,to do this with for loop,use this;

    for (int iterator = 0; iterator < myList.Count; iterator++)
    {
        if (myList[iterator].Contains("String Pattern"))
        {
            return myList[iterator];
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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