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Attempting to make a protected internal member of a protected internal class within a public class results with the following issue:

Inconsistent accessibility: field type 'what.Class1.ProtectedInternalClass' is less accessible than field 'what.Class1.SomeDataProvider.data'

The accessibility should be equivalent, as far as I know.

Where am I mistaken?

Origination class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace what
{
    public class Class1
    {
        // This class cannot be modified, is only 
        // here to produce a complete example.
        public class PublicClass
        {
            public PublicClass() { }
        }

        protected internal class ProtectedInternalClass : PublicClass
        {
            public ProtectedInternalClass() { }

            public void SomeExtraFunction() { }
        }

        public class SomeDataProvider
        {
            public int AnInterestingValue;
            public int AnotherInterestingValue;

            protected internal ProtectedInternalClass data; //<--- Occurs here.
            public PublicClass Data { get { return data; } }
        }


        public static SomeDataProvider RetrieveProvider()
        {
            SomeDataProvider provider = new SomeDataProvider();

            provider.data = new ProtectedInternalClass();
            provider.data.SomeExtraFunction();

            return provider;
        }

    }
}

Verifying protected and internal properties, same assembly:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace what
{
    public class Class2 : Class1
    {
        public Class2()
        {
            var pi = new ProtectedInternalClass();

            var provider = new SomeDataProvider();
            provider.data = pi;
        }
        // no errors here
    }

    public class Class3
    {
        public Class3()
        {
            var pi = new Class1.ProtectedInternalClass();

            var provider = new Class1.SomeDataProvider();
            provider.data = pi;
        }
        // no errors here
    }
}

Verifying protected and internal properties, different assembly:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace some_other_assembly
{
    public class Class4 : what.Class1
    {
        public Class4()
        {
            var pi = new ProtectedInternalClass();

            var provider = new SomeDataProvider();
            provider.data = pi;
        }
        // no errors here
    }

    public class Class5
    {
        public Class5()
        {
            var pi = new what.Class1.ProtectedInternalClass(); // <--- Inaccessible due to protection level, as it should be.

            var provider = new what.Class1.SomeDataProvider();
            provider.data = pi; // <--- Intellisense implies inaccessible, but not indicated via error.
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The protected applies to different classes, and this can be seen with

class Derived : what.Class1.SomeDataProvider // note: Derived is not a nested class
{
    public void f()
    {
        var data = this.data;
    }
}

in a different assembly.

this.data has to be accessible, since the class derives from SomeDataProvider. Its type, ProtectedInternalClass, is not accessible, since the class does not derive from Class1.

share|improve this answer
    
This one slipped right past me. You're correct, with the modification that your snippet should be accessing the protected internal member "data" successfully, and not the public member "Data". – felega Sep 12 '13 at 15:01
    
Oops, right, thanks for pointing that out. – hvd Sep 12 '13 at 15:49

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