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Back again with another rookie question. While working on a function for my homework project I found that my menu wouldn't exit when I press X, it worked just an hour ago and I haven't changed anything in main(). I commented out all the code in my functions just to be sure that nothing in a function interfered. I just can't find any problem and would be grateful for any help.

int main()
{
    char val, enter;
    int c;
/* loopa med do-while */
do
{
printf("===============================\n");
printf("	Olja i Norge AB\n");
printf("===============================\n\n");
printf("  Artikelregister\n");
printf(" A. Lista artiklar\n");
printf(" B. L\x84gg till artikel\n");
printf(" C. Radera artikel\n");
printf(" D. \x8Endra artikel\n\n");
printf("  Kundregister\n");
printf(" E. Lista kunder\n");
printf(" F. L\x84gg till kund\n");
printf(" G. Radera kund\n");
printf(" H. \x8Endra kund\n\n");
printf("  Ordrar\n");
printf(" I. Best\x84ll\n");
printf(" J. Lista ordrar\n\n");
printf(" X. Avsluta\n");
printf("\n===============================");
printf("\n===============================\n");
printf("V\x84lj: ");
scanf("%c", &val);

	do {
		c = getchar();
	} while (c != EOF && c != '\n');

	switch( val )
	{
		case 'A':
		case 'a':
			printf("\n");
			artList();
			break;

		case 'B':
		case 'b':
			printf("\n");
			artAdd();
			break;

		case 'C':
		case 'c':
			artDel();
			break;

		case 'D':
		case 'd':
			artEdit();
			break;

		case 'E':
		case 'e':
			kundList();
			break;

		case 'F':
		case 'f':
			kundAdd();
			break;

		case 'G':
		case 'g':
			kundDel();
			break;

		case 'H':
		case 'h':
			kundEdit();
			break;

		case 'I':
		case 'i':
			order();
			break;

		case 'J':
		case 'j':
			orderList();
			break;

		case 'X':
		case 'x':
			break;
	}

	printf("\nTryck <ENTER> f\x94r att forts\x84tta.");
	scanf("%c", &enter);
	system("cls");

}while(val != 'X' || val != 'x');

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Hint: instead of checking for 'X' and 'x', use the "tolower" or "toupper" functions and only compare once. For example, after reading in your character, convert it to upper or lower case, then compare. It will reduce frustration and size in your program. ;-) –  Thomas Matthews Dec 9 '09 at 20:56
    
@Thomas: are you sure that's a good rule of thumb? bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=415417 –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '09 at 21:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted
do { ... } while (val != 'X' || val != 'x');

if val is 'X' that while "converts" to

do { ... } while (0 || 1);

if val is 'x' that while "converts" to

do { ... } while (1 || 0);

if val is 'a' that while "converts" to

do { ... } while (1 || 1);

It never evaluates to false.

You need to rewrite the condition -- hint: use && :)


Edit

Oh ... that's assuming the "!= has precedence over ||". I never know what the precedence is, and I always use parenthesis in conditional expressions

do { ... } while ((val != 'X') || (val != 'x'));
share|improve this answer
    
Man, that's got to be one of the hardest things for new developers to learn, judging by all the and-or confusion I've seen. –  David Thornley Dec 9 '09 at 20:52
1  
+1 for explaining the answer not just giving a quick answer to gain rep. –  Tester101 Dec 9 '09 at 20:53
    
Thanks, what confused me is that it worked great for a week, and now it just started working properly i guess –  Fredrik Johansson Dec 9 '09 at 20:55
    
@Frederik: if it "does loop", then it must evaluate to true, not to false (as the loop keeps going while the expression evaluates to true). And the answer explains why it always evaluates to true, including when you type X or x. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 9 '09 at 20:55
1  
... and, yes, != has higher precedence than || (and &&). –  Pavel Minaev Dec 9 '09 at 20:57

Don't want to help you too much, but if you look at it carefully, this condition:

while(val != 'X' || val != 'x');

Will always evaluate to true.

share|improve this answer

Instead of

while(val != 'X' || val != 'x')

write

while(val != 'X' && val != 'x')
share|improve this answer
val != 'X' || val != 'x'

If val == 'x', then val != 'X', so the above is true. Similarly, the above is true when val == 'X'.

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