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I was looking at the source code for the CPAN Perl module Digest::Perl::MD5 and noticed that it has the she bang #! /usr/bin/false. Here's the first few lines of Digest/Perl/MD5.pm ...

#! /usr/bin/false
#
# $Id: MD5.pm,v 1.19 2004/02/14 02:25:32 lackas Exp $
#

package Digest::Perl::MD5;
use strict;
use integer;
use Exporter;
use vars qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORTER @EXPORT_OK);

... why would the author of Digest::Perl::MD5 use #! /usr/bin/false? And what if my system does not have /usr/bin/false but has /bin/false instead?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

why would the author of Digest::Perl::MD5 use #! /usr/bin/false?

So that if someone tried to use the module as an executable (Perl $ ./MD5.pm), it would quietly die instead of trying to execute the module as a program.

And what if my system does not have /usr/bin/false but has /bin/false instead?

Then it will nosily die complaining that it couldn't find /usr/bin/false if anyone tried that.

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2  
Quentin is entirely correct. I would add that any shebang line in a .pm file is entirely optional and not normal. 99% of the time, Perl modules are not installed in the PATH and will not have executable permission. Occasionally, you might also see a module with a #!/usr/bin/env perl shebang line, which usually indicates that the module could be executed (to run built-in tests for example). But unless you have a really unusual situation, I would not put a shebang line in a .pm file. It only raises questions (like yours) for future readers. –  Jeffrey Ryan Thalhammer Sep 12 '13 at 17:48
    
The only reason the #!/usr/bin/false shebang was even noticed by me was that I was packaging the Perl module in a RPM and when I attempted to install the RPM yum refused to install it because of a missing dependency on /usr/bin/false. I went ahead a simply patched MD5.pm to /bin/false and re-packaged. Thanks for all the comments and replies! –  Red Cricket Sep 13 '13 at 3:34

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