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In my latest task, I found some code like this:

if false
  print "a"
elsif true  
  print "b"
else  
   print "c"
end

Is if else statement correct? Will if ever be executed?

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Is what correct? The syntax? What do you mean by "When Ruby's if condition will run?"? Please elaborate. –  Jordan Sep 12 '13 at 17:40
    
Your question is not clear? What are you asking? –  Pierre-Louis Gottfrois Sep 12 '13 at 17:40
1  
2  
@neminem here's a 1-up to that, by yours truly: forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/p/18692/229458.aspx –  Renan Sep 12 '13 at 17:50
1  
@Renan I can beat that. My favorite "boolean", as documented in msdn, their wonderful 5-state "tristate" bool: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… (granted, the descriptions of the 3 states other than true/false are "not supported", but it's still in the documentation.) –  neminem Sep 12 '13 at 18:11
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closed as off-topic by Matt Ball, Pierre-Louis Gottfrois, dbyrne, Bort, Renan Sep 12 '13 at 17:41

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Matt Ball, Pierre-Louis Gottfrois, dbyrne, Bort, Renan
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code will always print "b".

One explanation is that this code was put in as a placeholder for some real logic which was supposed to be added at a later point in time.

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hmm. thanks :) ... –  akdev Sep 12 '13 at 17:45
    
Ugh. If I found that code in something we'd written in-house, there'd be some very pointed remarks about the proper use of comments and to NOT put nonsense code into place. –  the Tin Man Sep 12 '13 at 19:14
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