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The following code uses the heap:

char* getResult(int length) {
    char* result = new char[length];
    // Fill result...
    return result;
}

int main(void) {
    char* result = getResult(100);
    // Do something...
    delete result;
}

So result has to be deleted somewhere, preferably by the owner.

The code below, from what I understand, use an extension called VLA, which is part of C99, and not part of the C++ standard (but supported by GCC, and other compilers):

char* getResult(int length) {
    char result[length];
    // Fill result...
    return result;
}

int main(void) {
    char* result = getResult(100);
    // Do something...
}

Am I correct in assuming that result is still allocated on the stack in this case?

Is result a copy, or is it a reference to garbage memory? Is the above code safe?

share|improve this question
3  
The VLA is a red herring. You're returning the address of a variable that's going out of scope, period. – Kerrek SB Sep 12 '13 at 17:59
    
@KerrekSB I don't want to be picky but scope and lifetime are different concepts. When you call a function, a variable declared at block scope also goes out of scope, but its lifetime does not end. – ouah Sep 12 '13 at 18:09
    
@ouah: Yeah, true: "A variable whose lifetime is ending as it's going out of scope", I should have said. – Kerrek SB Sep 12 '13 at 18:23
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Am I correct in assuming that result is still allocated on the stack in this case?

Correct. VLA have automatic storage duration.

Is result a copy, or is it a reference to garbage memory? Is the above code safe?

The code is not safe. The address returned by getResult is an invalid address. Dereferencing the pointer invokes undefined behavior.

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@ShafikYaghmour VLA in GNU C and in GNU C++ have the same behavior as in C99. – ouah Sep 12 '13 at 18:03

You can not return it, in C it will have automatic storage duration(the object will not be valid once you leave the scope) and returning it will invoke undefined behavior, from the C99 draft standard section 6.2.4 Storage durations of objects paragraph 6:

For such an object that does have a variable length array type, its lifetime extends from the declaration of the object until execution of the program leaves the scope of the declaration.27) If the scope is entered recursively, a new instance of the object is created each time. The initial value of the object is indeterminate.

In C++ we have to rely on the docs since it is extension in that case and the gcc docs on VLA says that it is deallocated when the scope ends:

These arrays are declared like any other automatic arrays, but with a length that is not a constant expression. The storage is allocated at the point of declaration and deallocated when the block scope containing the declaration exits.

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When you return from getResult(), the char array result will go out of scope and be deallocated along with the stack frame for the function call. If you want to preserve the function structure, you'll have to call malloc and later free the memory.

share|improve this answer
    
“Scope” is the wrong term; the “lifetime” of the array result ends when the function returns. Identifiers have scope. Objects have lifetimes. Objects may be accessible even when their identifiers are out of scope, as when a pointer to an object is properly passed to a routine that cannot see its declaration. – Eric Postpischil Sep 12 '13 at 19:41

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