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I'm trying to resize text to the size of the parent box, Can someone please explain to me why this is working:

$('.box').css('font-size',$('.box').height());

and this is not working:

$('.box').css('font-size',$(this).height());

by the way I'm using jquery mobile with phonegap.

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2  
Well what does $(this) refer to? Try it out with console.log($(this)); –  Lix Sep 12 '13 at 18:03
    
He doesn't understand how to use $(this), that's the point of this question :P –  John Riselvato Sep 12 '13 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That doesn't work because you're calling the css function of $('.box') and passing it the value of $(this).height(), not a reference to its self. In that case this is still the context of the function that holds that line of code. Try something like this, to accomplish what you want:

$('.box').css('font-size',function () {
   return $(this).height() + "px";
});
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thanks for the explanation. It works perfectly now! –  Manolis Sep 12 '13 at 18:07
    
Why dont you accept his answer then? (: –  jah Sep 12 '13 at 20:05
    
@Manolis Tagging so you'll be notified of the previous comment. –  xdumaine Sep 12 '13 at 21:37
    
@xdumaine This is so weird, I accepted this answer yesterday and today was unticked... weird –  Manolis Sep 13 '13 at 15:39

As you can see from jQuery docs:

$('.box').css('font-size',function () {
   return $(this).height() + "px";
});

Context of the passed function is bind to the object(s) of which the css() method is called. That is why, this will be assigned to HTML element with the class dom.

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1  
You beat me to the punch by a few seconds, but SO strongly encourages explanations with code, to give the asker a bit of context and reasoning. See meta. –  xdumaine Sep 12 '13 at 18:08
    
Downvote for that? Wow... Didn't expect such a simple question need an explanation, well. –  Artyom Neustroev Sep 12 '13 at 18:29
    
I didn't down vote you, but it may have been whoever upvoted my comment. You still had working code, after all. –  xdumaine Sep 12 '13 at 18:35
    
@ArtyomNeustroev thanks for your answer, but when I had to select a reply, since both replies where the same, I ticked the one with an explanation. Actually the code is always so much better with an explanation. –  Manolis Sep 12 '13 at 18:41

Example:

HTML:

 <input type="button" class="box" id="someID" value="Click this box" />

jQuery:

$('.box').click(function() {

    var test = $(this).attr('id');
    alert('Here is the ID for the element on which you clicked: ' + test);

});

When you trap an event, that event is associated with an element on the page. In this case, the element is the button-type input field, and the trapped event is the 'click' event.

The code inside the click() event function can refer to the element that triggered the event as $(this).

If you wish to refer to any other element in the DOM, you must specify the element.

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