Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Goal: Attach a keydown event handler to a contenteditable span that is the child of a contenteditable div.

Problem: If you type in the span the parent event is triggered not the childs. What I want is the child to trigger so I can grab the text. I only want THAT contenteditable child as there will be many.

HTML/JS is below and the fiddle link is here: http://jsfiddle.net/aBYpt/4/


HTML

<div class="parent" contenteditable="true">
    Parent div text.

    <span class="child" contenteditable="true">First child span text.</span>
    <span class="child" contenteditable="true">Second child span text.</span>
    <span class="child" contenteditable="true">Third child span text.</span>
</div>

<div id="console"></div>

JavaScript/jQuery

$(document).on( 'keyup', '.parent', function() {
    $('#console').html( 'Parent keyup event fired.' );
    //do stuff
});

$(document).on( 'keyup', '.child', function() {
    $('#console').html( 'Child keyup event fired.' );
    //do stuff
});

**Note: Event handling is delegated to document because elements are dynamically added.

share|improve this question
    
review this (may be what you're after): stackoverflow.com/questions/1164213/… –  Duncan Sep 12 '13 at 18:27
1  
I just found this one which I think is more relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/5072164/… , seems like a hack tho... I think this is a bug. –  Joshua Robinson Sep 12 '13 at 18:32

1 Answer 1

So this is a bug. Workaround confirmed for FF23 and CHROME29 (on linux with no vm so can't test IE). You must set the wrapping spans as contenteditable false, you can't just omit declaring the contenteditable attribute, which is rediculous. Solution via Keypress event on nested content editable (jQuery)

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/aBYpt/14/

HTML

<div class="parent" contenteditable="true">
    Parent div text.

    <span contenteditable="false">
        <span class="child" contenteditable="true">First child span text.</span></span>
    <span contenteditable="false">
        <span class="child" contenteditable="true">Second child span text.</span>
    </span>
</div>

<div id="console"></div>

JavaScript/jQuery

$(document).on( 'keyup', '.parent', function() {
    //do stuff
    $('#console').html( 'Parent keyup event fired.' );
});

$(document).on( 'keyup', '.child', function(e) {
    //do stuff
    $('#console').html( 'Child keyup event fired.' );
    e.stopPropagation();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
I disagree that this is a bug: key events are only fired on elements capable of receiving the focus, which includes inputs and contenteditable elements. Elements within a contenteditable element don't qualify. You can infer the element containing the caret from the browser's selection object anyway. –  Tim Down Sep 13 '13 at 9:28
1  
With that logic, <div contenteditable="true"><span contenteditable="true"> it is expected to be able to detect a key event inside of this span </span></div>, but you can't. The only reason the contenteditable=true spans above are wrapped in contenteditable=false is because the key event on the span is not detectable otherwise. Stating "key events are only fired on elements capable of receiving the focus, which includes inputs and contenteditable elements" and then stating a contenteditable=true nested inside a contenteditable=true doesn't count is a non sequitur. –  Joshua Robinson Sep 13 '13 at 20:37
    
It's not a non sequitur. I admit I didn't define my terms in great detail (like this definition of "editing host", which is what I was getting at), but I hoped my point was clear. Elements that can receive focus can fire key events. Elements that are inside a contenteditable element without any elements with contenteditable="false" in between cannot receive focus, therefore do not generate key events. –  Tim Down Sep 13 '13 at 22:56
    
Where does it state that rule in the docs? It means elements are not receiving focus, even if they should. For example, anchor tags are able to accept focus. Even if we change the parent to a contenteditable=true div and child to a contenteditable=true anchor, typing in the anchor doesn't trigger a key event. How is that not a bug? You're right about inferring the element via selection object document.getSelection().anchorNode.parentNode.id. Thanks for pointing me in that direction! If you write up an answer I will accept it. –  Joshua Robinson Sep 14 '13 at 4:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.