Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question about border radius. Basically I am using code to create a sort of spotlight tool to find hidden html. Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pwneth/hj57k/1899/

css:

#tail {
border: 1000px solid #fff;
position: absolute;
float: left;
height: 100px;
width: 100px;
background-color: rgba(0,0,0,.0);
z-index: 100;
top: 0px;
left: 0px;
pointer-events:none;
-moz-box-shadow:    inset 0 0 20px #000000;
-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 20px #000000;
box-shadow:         inset 0 0 20px #000000;
}

I need to somehow set the border radius of the shape to make it appear as a circle. This is a problem however because this only effects the outside border, which is not something I want to effect. Just the inside of the border.

share|improve this question
4  
Not sure on how to solve your problem, but what you've made is pretty cool! –  BenM Sep 12 '13 at 18:26
    
@BenM thanx :-) –  mpn Sep 12 '13 at 18:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's a simpler option:

Fiddle

Just put the border-radius on the original element.

#tail
{
    /* ... */
    border-radius:100%;
}

Then just hide everything until the mouse has been over it.

body /* or whatever element you want */
{
    display:none;
}

Then do this:

$(document).bind('mouseenter', function (e) {
    $('body').show();
});
$('body').bind('mouseleave', function (e) {
    $(this).hide();
});

This way users will never see the hidden content.

share|improve this answer
    
very cool, this worked perfectly. thanks –  mpn Sep 12 '13 at 18:39

This solutions is more general and should be used if the desired shape is rounded square or rectangle

Using a after pseudo-element: http://jsfiddle.net/hj57k/1903/

#tail {
    border: 1000px solid #fff;
    position: absolute;
    float: left;
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: rgba(0,0,0,.0);
    z-index: 100;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    pointer-events:none;
}
#tail:after {
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    -moz-box-shadow:    inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    box-shadow:         inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    border: 10px solid white;
    border-radius: 20px;
    content: '';
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    left: -10px;
    position: relative;
    top: -10px;
    width: 100%;
}

You need the relative positioning to cover the left-upper edge that would otherwise still be visible. Beware of using box-model or browser inconsistency of calculation dimensions, this is working in webkit, might not be the case for IE.

share|improve this answer

Without too much change: jsFiddle

In summary, set border-radius = border-width + radius.

share|improve this answer

Jakub is close, but this produces the intended circle.

http://jsfiddle.net/hj57k/1905/

#tail {
    border: 1000px solid #fff;
    position: absolute;
    float: left;
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: rgba(0,0,0,.0);
    z-index: 100;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    pointer-events:none;
}
#tail:after {
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    -moz-box-shadow:    inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    box-shadow:         inset 0 0 20px #000000;
    border: 50px solid white;
    border-radius: 999px;
    content: '';
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    left: -50px;
    position: relative;
    top: -50px;
    width: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right, but in case of circle, Alex's solution is even better :D –  Jakub Michálek Sep 12 '13 at 18:35
    
You are right. Alex's solution is more elegant. :) –  Chris Rasco Sep 12 '13 at 18:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.