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I was trying to do the following in code and not sure how to use the modulus with case when

(1..100).each do |number|
  case number
    when % 3 and % 5
      puts "Hello World"
    when % 3
      puts "Hello"
    when % 5
      puts "World"
    else
      puts number
   end
end

I know I am just missing something dumb, but no idea what that is.

Edit: just changed it to how it would have to work.

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when number % 3 == 0 –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:27
1  
If you're trying to implement FizzBuzz, this is incorrect implementation. –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:28
1  
Or, (what you meant by) your condition % 3 and % 5 is redundant since it will never be evaluated to be true. –  sawa Sep 12 '13 at 19:33
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd probably write it something like this. It's an old-school thing:

(1..15).each do |number|
  case
  when (number % 3 == 0) && (number % 5 == 0)
    puts "(#{ number }) Hello World"
  when (number % 3 == 0)
    puts "(#{ number }) Hello"
  when (number % 5 == 0)
    puts "(#{ number }) World"
  else
    puts number
  end
end

# >> 1
# >> 2
# >> (3) Hello
# >> 4
# >> (5) World
# >> (6) Hello
# >> 7
# >> 8
# >> (9) Hello
# >> (10) World
# >> 11
# >> (12) Hello
# >> 13
# >> 14
# >> (15) Hello World

Here's how I'd really write it:

(1..15).each do |number|
  val = case
        when (number % 3 == 0) && (number % 5 == 0)
          "Hello World"
        when (number % 3 == 0)
          "Hello"
        when (number % 5 == 0)
          "World"
        else
          number
        end

  puts val
end

This is cleaner and even more readable. While it's possible to use case 0, the tests for each when become less easily understood, which is a prime consideration when we write code. We write for at least two people, ourselves at the moment, and for whoever is maintaining it in the future. It needs to make sense at all times, so the more obvious and clean the code is, the faster it'll enter the brain when it's read in a couple years, reducing debugging time and the work-load on the future you.

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It is good to know that case can be used without anything. This is more accurate of an answer (even without the output of the numbers in the strings). –  Toby Joiner Sep 13 '13 at 17:28
    
Those were just to make it easier to check the results. I'll add how I'd actually write it if it was my code. –  the Tin Man Sep 13 '13 at 17:34
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(1..100).each do |number|
  puts case number
  when ->x{x.%(3).zero? and x.%(5).zero?}
    "Hello World"
  when ->x{x.%(3).zero?}
    "Hello"
  when ->x{x.%(5).zero?}
    "World"
  else
    number
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the only correct implementation, but man, is it convoluted? –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:49
    
You mean the chain notation? I thought you were going to say something about it. –  sawa Sep 12 '13 at 19:49
    
Oh, and BTW, use && instead of and here :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:50
1  
RE && vs and: that will bite you in the ass one day. They have different precedence. Use && for conditions, and for control flow only. –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:55
1  
not that control flow. Think Perl/PHP's: do "something" or die –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 20:00
show 7 more comments

The below will work :

(1..15).each do |number|
  case 0
    when number%3 + number%5
      puts "Hello World"
    when number % 3
      puts "Hello"
    when number % 5
      puts "World"
    else
      puts number
   end
end

# >> 1
# >> 2
# >> Hello
# >> 4
# ...
# >> 13
# >> 14
# >> Hello World

FYI: Moved the third condition to be the first - otherwise it would never be reached.

share|improve this answer
1  
I didn't down rate your answer but the 3rd condition doesn't work. –  Toby Joiner Sep 12 '13 at 19:33
1  
Thank you, that fixed it. I appreciate the answer. –  Toby Joiner Sep 12 '13 at 19:38
2  
Code in your answer does not work as expected. What do you think should be output for 5? –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:51
1  
@ArupRakshit edited again, Hope you're OK with it (if not, revert :). Modified the first condition to be the sum of both modulo operations. –  tessi Sep 12 '13 at 19:59
1  
I think the current version of the answer should meet the conditions (it works and outputs what we think the OP wants). Are there any reasons left for the downvotes? –  tessi Sep 12 '13 at 21:08
show 6 more comments

Ok, first of all, you need some variable to use the modulo operator on. You already have specified that to be "number", so you should use that. The second thing is: "and" and "or" in Ruby are not boolean operators but rather control flow operators (think of "or die"). If you want the boolean operators, use && and ||.

In the case you have to specify what value you want your when's to have (in this case most likely 0).

So proper code would be:

  (1..100).each do |number|
  case 0
    when number % 3
      puts "Hello"
    when number % 5
      puts "World"
    when number % 3 && number % 5
      puts "Hello World"
    else
      puts number
  end
end
share|improve this answer
2  
Third condition will never match –  Sergio Tulentsev Sep 12 '13 at 19:45
    
I know that, but it's working code closest to the one he had. –  ciil Sep 12 '13 at 19:48
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