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For example, this code:

program sandbox
    implicit none
    real, dimension(2, 2) :: p
    p = reshape((/ 1, 3, 2, 4 /), shape(p))

    print *, spread(P, 2, 2)

end program sandbox

returns this array:

1 1 2 2
3 3 4 4

but I'm trying to get it to return this"

1 2 1 2
3 4 3 4

Is this possible using spread? In actuality, it needs to be generalized, because I may be producing matrices like

1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2
3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4

depending on other variables that I won't know at compile time.

share|improve this question
1  
My output is 1 3 1 3 2 4 2 4 and is really a 2x2x2 array, not a 2x4 array. – Kyle Kanos Sep 12 '13 at 19:58
    
Yeah, that's what mine outputs, but I didn't notice that it's not a 2x4 array so I just typed it up how I thought it was. Is there an easy way to just print the total dimensions of an array, instead of printing size(p, 1), size(p, 2), etc. all separately. – Michael A Sep 12 '13 at 20:17
2  
I removed my previous, completely dumb comment: there is obviously a function that give you dimensions, and we both used it recently: shape(p) ! :-) – user1220978 Sep 12 '13 at 20:41
    
@arbautjc I should have just looked that up because that's exactly what I was looking for. Ok, RTFM in more detail next time. – Michael A Sep 12 '13 at 20:53
1  
No hurt :-) Actually, I didn't find it in the F90 Handbook at first, then I asked myself: where would it be useful? ... D'oh! – user1220978 Sep 13 '13 at 7:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this (all is in the Fortran 90 standard except the [ ] notation in place of (/ /))

program sandbox
   implicit none
   real, dimension(2, 2) :: p
   real, dimension(2, 4) :: q
   integer i

   print *, "p"
   p = reshape([1, 3, 2, 4], shape(p))
   do i=1, 2
      print *, p(i, :)
   end do

   print *, "spread (orig)"
   q = reshape(spread(p, 2, 2), [2, 4])
   do i=1, 2
      print *, q(i, :)
   end do

   print *, "spread"
   q = reshape(spread(transpose(p), 2, 2), [2, 4], order=[2, 1])
   do i=1, 2
      print *, q(i, :)
   end do

   print *, "[p, p]"
   q = reshape([p, p], [2, 4])
   do i=1, 2
      print *, q(i, :)
   end do
end program sandbox
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, I went with #3 ("spread") because it easy to generalize it to more copies of p. My final code looks like this (pastebin). – Michael A Sep 12 '13 at 20:30

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