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I am trying to use ORDER BY with a date to get the records from my table in the following order:

TODAY (9 PM)
TODAY (7 PM)
TODAY (9 AM)
TODAY (7 AM)
PAST (3 DAYS AGO)
PAST (2 DAYS AGO)
PAST (1 DAYS AGO)
FUTURE (IN 1 DAY)
FUTURE (IN 2 DAYS)
FUTURE (IN 3 DAYS)

Currently I am using:

SELECT * 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY 
    IF(DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW()), 0, 1) ASC,
    IF(DATE(my_date) < DATE(NOW()), 0, 1) ASC,
    my_date ASC

But that gives me:

TODAY (7 AM) - WRONG
TODAY (9 AM) - WRONG
TODAY (7 PM) - WRONG
TODAY (9 PM) - WRONG
PAST (3 DAYS AGO)
PAST (2 DAYS AGO)
PAST (1 DAYS AGO)
FUTURE (IN 1 DAY)
FUTURE (IN 2 DAYS)
FUTURE (IN 3 DAYS)

I tried changing the the "today" sorting using DESC:

IF(DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW()), 0, 1) DESC,

But then it just sends the records to the very bottom (even below the future results). Is this possible to do with just SQL or will I have to run multiple queries using CodeIgniter's where() and merge them using PHP?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this will meet the specified requirement:

SELECT t.*
  FROM my_table t
 ORDER
    BY DATE(t.my_date)=DATE(NOW()) DESC
     , IF(DATE(t.my_date)=DATE(NOW()),t.my_date,DATE(NULL)) DESC
     , t.my_date ASC

Let's unpack that a little bit.

The first expression in the ORDER BY will evaluate to a 1 (if the conditional test is true), 0 (if it's false), or NULL (if one of the expressions is NULL.) We want descending order, to get the rows for which the condition is 'true' sorted first.

The second expression is an IF function. If the date portion of the my_date value is today's date, then we return my_date. We want that sorted in descending order (per the specification.) Otherwise, we want to return a constant, so that all the rest of the rows are going to be considered "equal".

Third, we order by the my_date value in ascending order. This won't affect the rows from today, those are already ordered in descending, so this really only affects the rows that are "equal" up to this point (which would be "not today"). Any rows with my_date value of NULL should wind up last (the first expression in the ORDER BY actually guarantees us that.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 interesting way – Parado Sep 12 '13 at 20:58
1  
@spencer7593 Bingo. – doitlikejustin Sep 12 '13 at 20:59

Parado's answer separates the values correctly. But the ordering also varies by group. The values are descending for the current day, and then ascending for the other days. Here is one way:

SELECT * 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY (case when DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW())
               then my_date
               else date('2000-01-01')
          end
         ) desc,
         my_date asc;

The second two groups can be combined. When the dates are ordered in ascending order, then the past comes before the future.

EDIT:

The purpose of the `date('2000-01-01') is for NULL values (ie. not today) to go last. You can do this with three part logic:

SELECT * 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY (case when DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW()) then 1 else 2 end),
         (case when DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW())
               then my_date
          end
         ) desc,
         my_date asc;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 interesting way – Parado Sep 12 '13 at 20:52
    
This is throwing an error, also. what is the purpose of setting the date to 2000-01-01? – doitlikejustin Sep 12 '13 at 20:53
    
@doitlikejustin . . . The problem was the lack of end for the case. The constant is there to be sure that non-current days appear after the current days. – Gordon Linoff Sep 12 '13 at 21:02
    
@GordonLinoff I see. The new answer does work, thanks for the explanation. – doitlikejustin Sep 12 '13 at 21:08

Try to use CASE syntax in order by clause and column my_date after that as below

SELECT * 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY 
    CASE 
      WHEN DATE(my_date) = DATE(NOW()) THEN 0
      WHEN DATE(my_date) < DATE(NOW()) THEN 1
      WHEN DATE(my_date) > DATE(NOW()) THEN 2
      ELSE 3
    END , DATE(my_date) desc
share|improve this answer
    
I believe this will order "today" rows in ascending order rather than in the descending order as specified by OP. – spencer7593 Sep 12 '13 at 20:49
    
This is an interesting way to order the dates but as @spencer7593 said, it's not ordering "today" in descending order. – doitlikejustin Sep 12 '13 at 20:50
    
@spencer7593 Of course, corrected :) – Parado Sep 12 '13 at 20:51
    
Hmm still in ascending order, and changing it to DESC does not work – doitlikejustin Sep 12 '13 at 20:54
    
@doitlikejustin what about DATE(my_date) desc as above ? – Parado Sep 12 '13 at 20:55

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