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I have design problem: there is a global resource that cannot be accessed from multiple threads at once, and so I need a lock around it to serialize the access to it. However, Python's garbage collector can run a __del__ method while I am doing some processing while holding the lock. If the destructor tries to access the resource, this ends up with a deadlock.

As an example, consider the following innocent-looking single-threaded code, which deadlocks if you run it:

import threading

class Handle(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.handle = do_stuff("get")

    def close(self):
        h = self.handle
        self.handle = None
        if h is not None:
            do_stuff("close %d" % h)

    def __del__(self):
        self.close()

_resource_lock = threading.Lock()

def do_stuff(what):
    _resource_lock.acquire()
    try:
        # GC can be invoked here -> deadlock!
        for j in range(20):
            list()
        return 1234
    finally:
        _resource_lock.release()

for j in range(1000):
    xs = []
    b = Handle()
    xs.append(b)
    xs.append(xs)

The resource can deal with several "handles" being open at the same time, and I'd need to deal with their life cycle. Abstracting this into a Handle class and putting the cleanup in __del__ seemed like a smart move, but the above issue breaks this.

One way to deal with the cleanup is to keep a "pending cleanup" list of handles, and if the lock is held when __del__ is run, insert the handle there, and clean up the list later on.

The question is:

  • Is there a threadsafe version of gc.disable() / gc.enable() that would solve this in a cleaner way?

  • Other ideas how to deal with this?

share|improve this question
    
What sort of resource are you trying to guard that can logically have zillions of 'handles' but must be constrained by a single mutex? –  IfLoop Sep 12 '13 at 21:23
    
A big external library written in C that has global state that can be swapped in and out for each operation. –  pv. Sep 12 '13 at 21:27

1 Answer 1

Python's Garbage Collector will not cleanup circular dependencies that have a "custom" __del__ method.

Since you already have a __del__ method, all you need is a circular dependency to "disable" the GC for those objects:

class Handle(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.handle = do_stuff("get")
        self._self = self

Now, that creates a memory leak, so how do we fix this?

Once you're ready to free the objects, just remove the circular dependency:

import threading
import gc


class Handle(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.handle = do_stuff("get")
        self._self = self

    def close(self):
        h = self.handle
        self.handle = None
        if h is not None:
            do_stuff("close %d" % h)

    def __del__(self):
        self.close()

_resource_lock = threading.Lock()

def do_stuff(what):
    _resource_lock.acquire()
    try:
        # GC can be invoked here -> deadlock!
        for j in range(20):
            list()
        return 1234
    finally:
        _resource_lock.release()

for j in range(1000):
    xs = []
    b = Handle()
    xs.append(b)
    xs.append(xs)


# Make sure the GC is up to date
gc.collect()
print "Length after work", len(gc.garbage)

# These are kept along due to our circular depency
# If we remove them from garbage, they come back
del gc.garbage[:]
gc.collect()
print "Length now", len(gc.garbage)

# Let's break it
for handle in gc.garbage:
    handle._self = None

# Now, our objects don't come back
del gc.garbage[:]
gc.collect()
print "Length after breaking circular dependencies", len(gc.garbage)

Will do:

Length after work 999
Length now 999
Length after breaking circular dependencies 0

On the other hand, why do you need to access this complex library in cleanup code, whose execution you don't control?

A cleaner solution here might be to do the cleanup in the loop, and break the circular dependency after the cleanup, so that the GC can then do its thing.

Here's an implementation:

import threading
import gc


class Handle(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.handle = do_stuff("get")
        self._self = self

    def close(self):
        h = self.handle
        self.handle = None
        if h is not None:
            do_stuff("close %d" % h)
        del self._self

    def __del__(self):
        # DO NOT TOUCH THIS
        self._ = None    

_resource_lock = threading.Lock()

def do_stuff(what):
    _resource_lock.acquire()
    try:
        # GC can be invoked here -> deadlock!
        for j in range(20):
            list()
        return 1234
    finally:
        _resource_lock.release()

for j in range(1000):
    xs = []
    b = Handle()
    xs.append(b)
    xs.append(xs)


# Make sure the GC is up to date
gc.collect()
print "Length after work", len(gc.garbage)

# These are kept along due to our circular depency
# If we remove them from garbage, they come back
del gc.garbage[:]
gc.collect()
print "Length now", len(gc.garbage)

# Let's break it
for handle in gc.garbage:
    handle.close()

# Now, our objects don't come back
del gc.garbage[:]
gc.collect()
print "Length after breaking circular dependencies", len(gc.garbage)

And the output shows that our circular dependency does prevent collection:

Length after work 999
Length now 999
Length after breaking circular dependencies 0
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be equivalent to the "pending free" list idea, except that here the pending free list is kept by the gc module (yech), and must be always flushed manually. –  pv. Sep 12 '13 at 21:42
    
@pv. Yes, the list also has the "magical" property of regenerating if you didn't break the dependencies correctly, see my update. –  Thomas Orozco Sep 12 '13 at 21:44
    
@pv. If you decide to go down the road of the second implementation, you might want to implement that logic in a separate class with comments or something, or someone's going to "garbage collect" your dummy __del__ method ;). –  Thomas Orozco Sep 12 '13 at 21:48
    
I think I don't want to use gc.garbage. Dealing with the life cycle manually and just removing the whole __del__ automagic cleanup seems like a simpler solution. –  pv. Sep 12 '13 at 22:05

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