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I have a class following this pattern:

class Foo
{
public:
    // Create a Foo whose value is absolute
    Foo(int x) : other_(0), a_(x)  {}

    // Create a Foo whose value is relative to another Foo
    Foo(Foo * other, int dx) : other_(other), a_(dx) {}

    // Get the value
    double x() const
    {
        if(other_)
            return other_->x() + a_;
        else
            return a_;
    }

private:
    Foo * other_;
    int a_;
};

The Foo objects are all owned by a Bar:

class Bar
{
public:
    ~Bar() { for(int i=0; i<foos_.size(); i++) delete foos_[i]; }

private:
    vector<Foo*> foos_;
};

Of course, this is a simplified example to get the idea. I have a guarantee that there are no loop of Foos, and that linked Foos all belong to the same instance of Bar. So far, so good. To do things the C++11 way, I would use vector< unique_ptr<Foo> > foos_; in Bar, and pass foos_[i].get() as potential argument of a Foo constructor.

There is the deal:

This a GUI application, and the user can interactively delete some Foo at will. The expected behaviour is that if foo1 is deleted, and foo2 is relative to foo1, then foo2 becomes now "absolute":

void Foo::convertToAbsolute() { a_ += other_->x(); other_ = 0; }

void usageScenario()
{
    Foo * foo1 = new Foo(42);      
    Foo * foo2 = new Foo(foo1, 42);
    // Here, foo1->x() = 42 and foo2->x() = 84

    foo1->setX(10);
    // Here, foo1->x() = 10 and foo2->x() = 52

    delete foo1;
    // Here, foo2->x() = 52
}

I know it is possible to do it using raw pointers, by using a a DAG structure with back-pointers, so the Foo are aware of who "depends on them", and can inform them before deletion (possible solutions detailed here and here ).

My question is: Would you handle it the same way? Is there a way using standard C++11 smart pointers to avoid having the explicit back-pointers, and then avoid explicitely calling areRelativeToMe_[i]->convertToAbsolute(); in the destructor of Foo? I was thinking about weak_ptr, something in the spirit of:

class Foo { /* ... */ weak_ptr<Foo> other_; };

double Foo::x() const
{
    if(other_.isExpired())
        convertToAbsolute();

    // ...
}

But the issue is that convertToAbsolute() needs the relative Foo to still exist. So I need a non-owning smart-pointer that can tell "this reference is logically expired", but actually extends the lifetime of the referenced object, until it is not needed.

It could be seen either like a weak_ptr extending the lifetime until it is not shared with any other weak_ptr:

class Foo { /* ... */ extended_weak_ptr<Foo> other_; };

double Foo::x() const
{
    if(other_.isExpired())
    {
        convertToAbsolute();
        other_.reset(); // now the object is destructed,  unless other
                          // foos still have to release it
    }

    // ...
}

Or like a shared_ptr with different level of ownership:

class Bar { /* ... */ vector< multilevel_shared_ptr<Foo> foos_; };

class Foo { /* ... */ multilevel_shared_ptr<Foo> other_; };

void Bar::createFoos()
{ 
    // Bar owns the Foo* with the highest level of ownership "Level1"

    // Creating an absolute Foo
    foos_.push_back( multilevel_unique_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(42), Level1) );

    // Creating a relative Foo 
    foos_.push_back( multilevel_unique_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(foos_[0],7), Level1) );
}

Foo::Foo(const multilevel_unique_ptr<Foo> & other, int dx) :
    other_( other, Level2 ),
   // Foo owns the Foo* with the lowest level of ownership "Level2"
    a_(dx) 
{
}

double Foo::x() const
{
    if(other_.noLevel1Owner()) // returns true if not shared 
                               // with any Level1 owner
    {
        convertToAbsolute();
        other_.reset(); // now the object is destructed, unless 
                        // shared with other Level2 owners
    }
    // ...
}

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
1  
"a non-owning reference that must be informed before the reference is destructed" - that seems like a perfect task for an owning reference. Are you sure this is not an XY problem? –  user529758 Sep 12 '13 at 21:41
    
@H2CO3 what's an XY problem? The idea is that I must still know when it is "conceptually expired", that shared_ptr cannot provide since, well... it is not expired if some other guy still owns it ;-) –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 21:43
    
The XY problem. Well, I see. Perhaps you could use something like a delegate or notifications or something... I'm not great at using the C++ stdlib, just saying. –  user529758 Sep 12 '13 at 21:44
1  
Ok, didn't know about this XY terminology ;-) My actual problem is indeed, when an object is deleted, to inform a dependent object that this deletion occurs. The "trivial" solution is using raw pointer and inform by hand dependent objects, as shown. I wondered if it was possible to do it using smart pointers. Thx anyway :-) –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 21:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All Foo are owned by Bar. Therefore all deletions of Foo happen in Bar methods. So I might implement this logic inside Bar:

void Bar::remove(Foo* f)
{
    using namespace std::placeholders;
    assert(std::any_of(begin(foos_), end(foos_),
                       std::bind(std::equal_to<decltype(f)>(), f, _1));

    auto const& children = /* some code which determines which other Foo depend on f */;
    std::for_each(begin(children), end(children),
                  std::mem_fn(&Foo::convertToAbsolute));
    foos_.remove(f);

    delete f; // not needed if using smart ptrs
}

This would ensure that the expiring Foo still exists when convertToAbsolute is called on its dependents.

The choice of how to compute children is up to you. I would probably have each Foo keep track of its own children (cyclic non-owning pointers), but you could also keep track of it inside Bar, or search through foos_ on demand to recompute it when needed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, this bugged me and was helpful: "All Foo are owned by Bar. Therefore all deletions of Foo happen in Bar methods.". Is this true under most accepted definitions of ownership? Couldn't a non-owning holder delete a reference? If yes then no, then I was wrong stating that Bar owns the Foo. I would like that an external class with a pointer of Foo could delete it. Oh, but now I'm thinking! Maybe this may be done not by "deleting" the object, but calling foo->destroy() (e.g., from a weak_ptr) , that delegates the destruction to the owning Bar, so your approach is still valid? –  Boris Sep 13 '13 at 21:59
1  
@Boris All definitions of ownership that I have come across include responsibility for deletion. Although it's reasonable to permit a "transfer of ownership" from one owner to another. The main thing you need to make sure of is that each Foo is deleted exactly once. If some other code deletes a Foo, then you need to remove it from the Bar anyway. foo->destroy() sounds like a good solution. –  Oktalist Sep 14 '13 at 0:04
1  
Furthermore, bare delete is a low-level primitive memory-management mechanism, so trying to use it to signal changes in high-level logical relationships was probably not the best idea. –  Oktalist Sep 14 '13 at 13:43
    
Yep, this finally made a lot of sense. It made me realize that indeed it is Bar responsibility to do this and I can't really move it to Foo, since anyway Bar must be aware of the deletion to keep the data structure sound. Thx! –  Boris Sep 16 '13 at 4:43
    
One more thing: re the answers which rely on doing something in a destructor (including any smart pointer based solution), remember you should make sure that destructors don't throw exceptions. –  Oktalist Sep 16 '13 at 14:01

You can use the double link approach even with more than one other dependent object. You only have to link together the dependents of the same object:

class Foo {
public:
  explicit Foo(double x)
  : v(x), foot(nullptr), next(nullptr), dept(nullptr) {}

  // construct as relative object;  complexity O(1)
  Foo(Foo*f, double x)
  : v(x), foot(f), dept(nullptr)
  { foot->add_dept(this); }

  // destruct;  complexity  O(n_dept) + O(foot->n_dept)
  //                        O(1)  if !destroy_carefully
  ~Foo()
  {
    if(destroy_carefully) {
      for(Foo*p=dept; p;) {
        Foo*n=p->next;
        p->unroot();
        p=n;
      }
      if(foot) foot->remove_dept(this);
    }
  }

  double x() const
  { return foot? foot->x() + v : v; }

private:

  double v;   // my position relative to foot if non-null
  Foo*foot;   // my foot point
  Foo*next;   // next object with same foot point as me
  Foo*dept;   // first object with me as foot point

  // change to un-rooted;  complexity: O(1)
  void unroot()
  { v+=foot->x(); foot=nullptr; next=nullptr; }

  // add d to the linked list of dependents;  complexity O(1)
  void add_dept(const Foo*d)
  { d->next=dept; dept=d; }

  // remove d from the linked list of dependents ; complexity O(n_dept)
  void remove_dept(const Foo*d)
  {
    for(Foo*p=dept; p; p=p->next)
      if(p==d) { p=d->next; break; }
  }
  static bool destroy_carefully;

};
bool Foo::destroy_carefully = true;

Here, setting Foo::destroy_carefully=false allows you to delete all remaining objects without going through the untangling of mutual references (which can be expensive).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I am so sorry you went into the trouble of writting this! +1 for the time anyway. I do know how I would implement it using raw pointers and pretty confident on the details and how it would work ("The simplest raw pointer approach I can think of is to have a two-way link [...]"). My question was raelly more: "Would you do the same thing (then a yes is enough), or is there an alternative using smart pointerd?". Should have make this clearer I guess. –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 22:51
    
No problem, was fun. It's a three-way link, not a two-way link. I was mainly spurred to disprove David's answer. –  Walter Sep 12 '13 at 22:53
    
Hehe, your code gave me an headache but I think is correct after a few drawings executing the methods :-D But you actually don't need "next", a two-way link (parent-child) is enough, no need to order them. (I'll write it as an answer). The added information doesn't even give you any performance gain since anyway your remove_dept is linear in number of dependent objects. Worse, It's actually less efficient in number of RAM access since you have to maintain the next consistency. –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 23:12
    
@Boris Without the next? How can you then unroot all dependents if an object gets destroyed? It has to find all other objects with other->foot==this. –  Walter Sep 12 '13 at 23:23
    
@Walter: This is clearly not a double linked list by any standard. But rather a tree with back pointers. One of the common implementations of a variable arity tree is holding a pointer to the first descendant, and a list of siblings with an optional backpointer to the parent. In this case the tree is rooted at the foot (backpointer to parent), next is the singly linked list of siblings and dept is the pointer to the first child. This clearly does not disprove that it cannot be done with a doubly linked list. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 13 '13 at 1:21

Interesting problem. I guess you figured that you can add a pointer to the 'child' object. I am not sure, whether smart pointers help here. I tried to implement the code below using std::weak_ptr<Foo> but you can only use it for other_ and not for the listener.

Another thought I had was to leave the responsibility to some higher power. The problem that you have is that you would like to do the update when the destructor is called. Perhaps better approach would be to call convertToAbsolute() from somewhere else. For example, if you are storing the Foos in a vector and the user clicks delete in the UI, you need the index of the object in order to delete so might as well update the adjacent item to absolute value.

Below is a solution that uses a Foo*.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>


class Foo
{
public:
    // Create a Foo whose value is absolute
    Foo(int x) : other_(nullptr), listener_(nullptr), a_(x)
    {}

    // Create a Foo whose value is relative to another Foo
    Foo(Foo* other, int dx) : 
    other_(other), listener_(nullptr), a_(dx) 
    {
        other->setListener(this);
    }

    ~Foo()
    {
        convertToAbsolute();
        if (listener_)
            listener_->other_ = nullptr;
    }

    // Get the value
    double x() const
    {
        if(other_)
            return other_->x() + a_;
        else
            return a_;
    }

    void setX(int i)
    {
        a_ = i;
    }

    void convertToAbsolute()
    {
        if (listener_)
            listener_->a_ += a_;
    }

    void setListener(Foo* listener)
    {
        listener_ = listener;
    }

private:
    Foo* other_;
    Foo* listener_;
    int a_;
};


void printFoos(const std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo>>& foos)
{
    std::cout << "Printing foos:\n";
    for(const auto& f : foos)
        std::cout << '\t' << f->x() << '\n';
}

int main(int argc, const char** argv)
{
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo>> foos;
    try
    {
        auto foo1 = std::make_shared<Foo>(42);
        auto foo2 = std::make_shared<Foo>(foo1.get(), 42);

        foos.emplace_back(foo1);
        foos.emplace_back(foo2);
    }
    catch (std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cerr << e.what() << '\n';
    }

    // Here, foo1->x() = 42 and foo2->x() = 84
    printFoos(foos);

    foos[0]->setX(10);
    // Here, foo1->x() = 10 and foo2->x() = 52
    printFoos(foos);

    foos.erase(foos.begin());
    // Here, foo2->x() = 52
    printFoos(foos);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So indeed, using shared_ptr or unique_ptr in the caller code makes things cleaner caller-side, but my issue was really in Foo side. I was wondering if a smart pointer could be used for other_ to delay its destruction, avoiding the whole "listener" thing. It seems the answer is no using the standard smart pointers, and one would need implementing its own extended smart pointer that I describe. Your help was much appreciated though :-) –  Boris Sep 13 '13 at 0:46
    
I think the more I think about the problem, the more interesting it gets. I think only when I started to write the solution I realised what the problem was. And only after solving it I understood what the question really is :-) Anyway, I updated the answer by adding an extra thought. –  Roman Kutlak Sep 13 '13 at 17:31
    
Yep, moving the responsibility of deleting cleanly to a higher power would definitely be a good architecture design. :-) My concern is that it is a research project, so you need fast iterations to debug ideas, and it's hard to plan architecture in advance. Hence as a guideline, I favor self-contained safe classes rather than safe global architecture. It makes it faster to prototype and shuffle things around :-) For now, I'm going for the raw back-pointers to get things done, but will probably play around with handmade extended smart pointers later, cause it looks fun ;-) –  Boris Sep 13 '13 at 20:34

If you have a Signal/Slot framework, that provides a nice place to do the unlinking. For example, using the Qt libraries these classes could look like:

class Foo : public QObject
{
Q_OBJECT
public:
    // Create a Foo whose value is absolute
    Foo(int x) : QObject(nullptr), other_(nullptr), a_(x) {}

    // Create a Foo whose value is relative to another Foo
    Foo(Foo * other, int dx) : QObject(nullptr) other_(other), a_(dx) {
        connect(other, SIGNAL(foo_dying()), this, SLOT(make_absolute()));
    }

    ~Foo() { emit foo_dying(); }

    // Get the value
    double x() const
    {
        if(other_)
            return other_->x() + a_;
        else
            return a_;
    }

signals:
    void foo_dying();

private slots:
    void make_absolute()
    {
        a_ += other_->x();
        other_ = nullptr;
    }

private:
    Foo * other_;
    int a_;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that is a wonderful solution, I wonder why I didn't think about it! Just some notes: 1) in fact, the signal must be void foo_dying(Foo *); then emit foo_dying(this); for irrelevant reasons you couldn't guess with my simplified example. 2) If anyone read this, make sure your connection type is Qt::DirectConnection (then doesn't work across threads). 3) Too bad we can't use the built-in signal QObject::destroyed() since it is called in ~QObject(), and hence Foo::x() is not available anymore. Otherwise, it would even be possible not to define ~Foo at all! –  Boris Sep 13 '13 at 23:53
    
4) Again if anyone read this, keep in mind that this has quite a big memory overhead, but not that much time overhead I would guess. –  Boris Sep 13 '13 at 23:54
    
Yeah, I was first going to write it as using destroyed() but realized that wouldn't work. –  aschepler Sep 14 '13 at 4:51

Here is probably the simplest way to achieve the goal using back-pointers. You can use the container you want depending on your complexity requirements (e.g., a set, hash table, vector, linked list, etc.). A more involved but more efficient approach is proposed by Walter.

class Foo
{
public:
    // Create a Foo whose value is absolute
    Foo(int x) : other_(0), a_(x)  {}

    // Create a Foo whose value is relative to another Foo
    Foo(Foo * other, int dx) : other_(other), a_(dx)
    {
        other->areRelativeToMe_.insert(this);
    }

    // Get the value
    double x() const
    {
        if(other_)
            return other_->x() + a_;
        else
            return a_;
    }

    // delete the Foo
    Foo::~Foo()
    {
        // Inform the one I depend on, if any, that I'm getting destroyed
        if(other_)
            other_->areRelativeToMe_.remove(this);

        // Inform people that depends on me that I'm getting destructed
        for(int i=0; i<areRelativeToMe_.size(); i++)
            areRelativeToMe_[i]->convertToAbsolute();
    }

private:
    Foo * other_;
    int a_;
    Container<Foo*> areRelativeToMe_; // must provide insert(Foo*) 
                                      //          and remove(Foo*)

    // Convert to absolute
    void convertToAbsolute()
    {
        a_ += other_->x(); 
        other_ = 0; 
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of two pointers (dept and next) you maintain a complete std::set<Foo*> for the dependents. This requires more RAM and is slower (logarithmic complexity upon insertion). –  Walter Sep 12 '13 at 23:35
    
@Walter: AND logarithmic complexity upon deletion too. Your solution use linear time to delete it. ;-) It depends on what you want. Anyway, you can use a list instead of a set, so you have the same complexity as you, but much simpler to program. (I mean, it is the same algorithm executed underneath, but let the list do it for you ;-) ) –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 23:39
    
@Walter Actually, at first I used a vector. But realize the std::vector is stupid enough not to provide a (linear time) erase(const T &) method, so the presentation was cleaner using a set. –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 23:42
    
@Walter Nevermind, you are right :-D (Concerning the RAM) –  Boris Sep 12 '13 at 23:44
1  
one byte -- on what kind machine are you with pointers (let along std::set) of this size? What is worth what is, of course, a matter of taste, but readability can be helped with comments, as I have tried. –  Walter Sep 13 '13 at 0:21

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