Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What does PHP syntax $var1[] = $var2 mean?

Note the [] after $var1 varable.

share|improve this question
4  
php.net/manual/en/function.array-push.php. look carefully for the first Note: section – davidkonrad Sep 12 '13 at 21:49
1  
php.net/manual/en/language.types.array.php - see "Creating/modifying with square bracket syntax" – Mark Baker Sep 12 '13 at 21:49
    
It means $var1 is an array and is receiving the value of $var2 to it's next available position (that's the reason of the empty []). – mathielo Sep 12 '13 at 21:50
up vote 7 down vote accepted

It means that $var1 is an array, and this syntax means you are inserting $var2 into a new element at the end of the array.

So if your array had 2 elements before, like this:

$var1=( 1 => 3, 2 => 4)

and the value of $var2 was 5, it would not look like this:

$var1=( 1 => 3, 2 => 4, 3 => 5)

It also means that if $var2 was an array itself, you have just created a two dimensional array. Assuming the following:

$var1=( 1 => 3, 2 => 4)
$var2=( 1 => 10, 2=>20)

doing a $var1[]=$var2; wouls result in an array like this:

$var1=( 1 => 3, 2 => 4, 3 => (1 =>10, 2 => 20))

As an aside, if you haven't used multi-dimensional arrays yet, accessing the data is quite simple. If I wanted to use the value 20 from our new array, I could do it in this manner:

echo $var1[3][2];

Note the second set of square brackets - basically you are saying I want to access element two of the array inside element 3 of the $var1 array.

On that note, there is one thing to be aware of. If you are working with multi-dimensional arrays, this syntax can catch you out inside a loop structure of some sort. Lets say you have a two dimensional array where you store some records and want to get more from the database:

$var1 = ( 
    1 => (id =>1, age => 25, posts => 40),
    2 => (id =>2, age => 29, posts => 140),
    3 => (id =>3, age => 32, posts => 12)
    )

A loop like this following:

while($row=someDatabaseRow)
{
    $var1[]=$row['id']; // value 4
    $var1[]=$row['age']; // value 21
    $var1[]=$row['posts']; // value 34
}

will infact insert a new element for every execution, hence your array would end up looking like this:

$var1 = ( 
    1 => (id =>1, age => 25, posts => 40),
    2 => (id =>2, age => 29, posts => 140),
    3 => (id =>3, age => 32, posts => 12),
    4 => 4,
    5 => 21,
    6 => 34
    )

The correct way would be to assemble the array first, then append it to your current array to maintain the strucutre, like this:

while($row=someDatabaseRow)
{
    $tempArr= array();
    $tempArr[]=$row['id']; // value 4
    $tempArr[]=$row['age']; // value 21
    $tempArr[]=$row['posts']; // value 34
    $var1[]=$tempArr;
}

Now your array would look like you expected, namely:

$var1 = ( 
    1 => (id =>1, age => 25, posts => 40),
    2 => (id =>2, age => 29, posts => 140),
    3 => (id =>3, age => 32, posts => 12)
    4 => (id =>4, age => 21, posts => 34)
    )
share|improve this answer
1  
$var1[]=$tempArr; -- this would only push the last item (i.e. $row['posts']) to $var1. – Amal Murali Nov 8 '13 at 19:42
    
@AmalMurali Very well spotted. I changed the code with what I meant to do. Can't believe no-one picked that up before you did! +1 – Fluffeh Nov 8 '13 at 20:25

It means that you're pushing the value of var2 to array var1.

share|improve this answer

That's shorthand for array_push()

It will make $var1 and array (if it isn't already) and push $var2 in to it.

share|improve this answer

It basically makes $var1 an array and adding to it's end a value of $var2.

$var1 = NULL;
$var2 = 'abc';
$var1[] = $var2;

$var1 is now an array containing one value: 'abc'

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.