Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I process an array @test_array of integers, creating a new array @cells that contains an instance of class Cell for each element of the array, putting the value of the @test_array element into the instance variable @value of the newly created object?

Afterwards, I want to be able to change the @value of the different objects, and at the end of the program, I want to output an array of the all of the objects @value.

class Cells

  attr_accessor :value

  def initialize(value)
    @value = value
  end

end

class Grid

  attr_accessor :test_array, :cells

  def initialize
    @test_array = [1, 2, 3, 4]
    @cells = []
    @test_array.each { |value| @cells << Cell.new(value) }
  end

  def put_values_of_objects_to_array
    @cells.value_to_a ????????
  end

end

This is what I get after running the code taking into account one of the answers:

2.0.0p247 :080 > cells = []
 => [] 
2.0.0p247 :081 > abc = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] 
2.0.0p247 :082 > abc.map {|value| cells << Cell.new(value)}
 => [[#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>], [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>]] 
2.0.0p247 :083 > cells
 => [#<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313d8 @value=1>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3313b0 @value=2>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331388 @value=3>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331360 @value=4>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331338 @value=5>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331310 @value=6>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312e8 @value=7>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc3312c0 @value=8>, #<Cell:0x007fe3dc331298 @value=9>] 
2.0.0p247 :084 > 
share|improve this question
    
In any case, test_array.each {|value| @cells << Cell.new(value)} should be @test_array.each {|value| @cells << Cell.new(value)}. – steenslag Sep 12 '13 at 22:32

This is a useful exercise and you are very close. The stuff with declaring an array (@cells = []) and then looping over another array to do something with each element and adding the result to the new array does work, but it is a pattern which is so common that many languages have an easier solution. In Ruby it's called 'map' aliased as 'collect'. Demo:

class Cell

attr_accessor :value

  def initialize(value)
    @value = value
  end

end

class Grid

attr_accessor :test_array, :cells

  def initialize
    @test_array = [1,2,3,4]
    @cells = @test_array.map{|a_value| Cell.new(a_value)}
   end

  def put_values_of_objects_to_array
    @cells.map{|cell| cell.value}
  end

end


f = Grid.new
p f.put_values_of_objects_to_array #=> [1, 2, 3, 4]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this answer. However, i have no idea why, when i run the command, it returns an array with 81 elements with 81 elements inside each one. So basically it gets 6561 Class objects. Any idea why? I checked the syntax over and over again and it's just like you posted... – Paulo Gaspar Sep 12 '13 at 23:34
class Cell
  attr_accessor :values

  @arrs = []    #Creates a "class instance variable"

  class <<self  #Creates an accessor for the "class instance variable"
    attr_reader :arrs
  end

  def initialize(values)
    @values = values
    self.class.arrs << @values    #Add the @values array to the "class instance variable"
  end
end

test_array = [1, 2, 3]

@cells = test_array.map do |num|   #Create the cells
  Cell.new(test_array.dup)
end

p @cells   

--output:--
[#<Cell:0x0000010085ffd8 @values=[1, 2, 3]>, #<Cell:0x0000010085ff88 @values=[1, 2, 3]>, #<Cell:0x0000010085ff60 @values=[1, 2, 3]>]


@cells.each_with_index do |cell, i|   #Change the last value of each cell's @values array
  cell.values[-1] = i
end


p Cell.arrs   #Show all the @values arrays of all the cells:

--output:--
[[1, 2, 3, 0], [1, 2, 3, 1], [1, 2, 3, 2]]

Now that you've added the Grid class to your post, you can add a class instance variable to the Grid class--rather than to the Cell class--to keep track of the arrays.

class Grid
  attr_accessor :cells

  TEST_ARRAY = [1, 2, 3, 4]

  @arrs = []
  class <<self
    attr_reader :arrs
  end

  def initialize 
    @cells = []

    TEST_ARRAY.each do |value| 
      new_cell = Cell.new(TEST_ARRAY.dup) 
      @cells << new_cell
      self.class.arrs << new_cell.values
    end

  end

end

hey, thanks for this, however what I want is for one element of the test_array to go into the object, and not the whole array.

That's not what this means:

...putting the value of the @test_array element into the instance variable @value

class Cell
  attr_accessor :values

  def initialize(value)
    @values = [value]
  end
end

class Grid
  attr_accessor :cells

  TEST_ARRAY = [1, 2, 3, 4]

  @cell_values = []
  class <<self
    attr_reader :cell_values
  end

  def initialize 
    @cells = []

    TEST_ARRAY.each_with_index do |value, i| 
      new_cell = Cell.new(TEST_ARRAY[i]) 
      @cells << new_cell
      self.class.cell_values << new_cell.values
    end

  end

end

mygrid = Grid.new
p Grid.cell_values

mygrid.cells.each do |cell|
  cell.values << 5
end

p Grid.cell_values


--output:--
[[1], [2], [3], [4]]
[[1, 5], [2, 5], [3, 5], [4, 5]]
share|improve this answer
    
hey, thanks for this, however what I want is for one element of the test_array to go into the object, and not the whole array. – Paulo Gaspar Sep 12 '13 at 23:34
    
@PauloGaspar, See added code. – 7stud Sep 13 '13 at 2:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.