Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

A question here raised a question for me:

Ternary operations in c#, say x = y ? a : b, use the type of either a or b to determine the type of the ternary expression. Why doesn't it use the type of x? In any given situation, isn't there an expected return type that it can use?

EDIT: For the sake of clarity, when I say

Why doesn't it use the type of x?

I suppose I mean

Why doesn't it first try to use the type of x?

As the documentation states:

  • If X and Y are the same type, then this is the type of the conditional expression.
  • Otherwise, if an implicit conversion (Section 6.1) exists from X to Y, but not from Y to X, then Y is the type of the conditional expression.
  • Otherwise, if an implicit conversion (Section 6.1) exists from Y to X, but not from X to Y, then X is the type of the conditional expression.
  • Otherwise, no expression type can be determined, and a compile-time error occurs.

Could this process start with:

  • If the resolution type is unambiguous, then it is the type of the conditional expression.
share|improve this question
3  
Method overloading in C# does not use return value. Why should operators be different? – John Saunders Sep 12 '13 at 22:29
1  
What if x is declared dynamic or var? – Nikola Dimitroff Sep 12 '13 at 22:30
1  
@NikolaDimitroff then VS will say that the type cannot be inferred – user1306322 Sep 12 '13 at 22:31
    
At least the original question used a better name for the operator. Calling it "the ternary operator" because C# only defines one such operator is a sloppy shorthand. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 13 '13 at 7:37
up vote 9 down vote accepted

"In any given situation, isn't there an expected return type that it can use?"

No. Consider for example:

string s = Convert.ToString(y ? a : b);

There are multiple overloads of the ToString method that takes different data types. The compiler needs to know what the type of the expression is to know which overload to use.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. In this case, the "target" type as asked by the Op would have to be the type of the argument expected by the function... which is overloaded. Even if you have rules for something like taking the broadest overload possible, that would be the type "Object", and who wants that? – Joel Coehoorn Sep 12 '13 at 22:44
    
That makes sense, but even in the instance where x is ambiguous, it seems like the normal process could be used (try a, then b). – MirroredFate Sep 12 '13 at 22:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.