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I am confused as to why when I float an object it no longer expands the border of the container it is in. Here is a simple bit of code I start with:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Learning CSS</title>

<style>
    .content 
    {
        border: #000000 solid 3px;
        clear: left;
        padding: 1em;
    }

    .stuff
    {

    }

</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Learning CSS</h1>
<div class="content">
    <h2>Page 1</h2>
    <p>Text...</p>
    <div class="stuff">
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
    </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

This link will display the results of this code

When I change the style of .stuff to: .stuff { float:right; }

This link shows what I get now

I would appreciate someone explaining why the floating content no longer expands the parent div or is contained in the parent div .content ?

thanks in advance

share|improve this question
2  
When a Duck floats does it make the pond grow bigger? But if it is not a Duck cannot it do something else? –  Ed Heal Sep 12 '13 at 22:38
1  
When you use float, the div will adjust to the width it needs, as opposed to the maximum width it has to its disposal (which is the default behaviour for display: block). –  Pekka 웃 Sep 12 '13 at 22:38
    
This is a problem that a clearfix would solve. –  Meow Mix Sep 12 '13 at 22:39
    
See css-tricks.com/all-about-floats. Floats are useful for many different layout effects, but understanding how they affect and are affected by document flow is important :-) –  thirdender Sep 12 '13 at 22:57
    
You are not confused, you just don't know what it is. –  Milche Patern Sep 12 '13 at 23:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You'll need to add overflow: hidden; to your container element. Here is a working jsFiddle.

Edit: both overflow: hidden and overflow:auto work in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Chopper, that works great, thank you. What I want to know is why it works differently? That is what I do not understand. When float is omitted the div content expands properly based on how much is in the div stuff. When the div stuff is floated that does not happen. I would like to understand why. –  Shimon Sep 12 '13 at 22:59
    
When you float and element, it breaks out of the height of the parent container. In fact, you could even use a fixed height for the parent container instead of an overflow, but you might not get the results you want. Just depends on your situation. –  Xarcell Sep 12 '13 at 23:05
    
That's a good question. I think it is because when you specify float:right without specifying a height for the div, it is ambiguous what 'floating right' even means. With overflow: auto your container tries to expand as far as it can with its content before clipping the content. –  chopper Sep 12 '13 at 23:06
    
Xarcell, it certainly behaves that way. If that is the case it would seem to be a bug as it should not matter what css you apply it should ALWAYS remain contained within its parent. –  Shimon Sep 12 '13 at 23:51

You need overflow: auto to the parent container, not overflow: hidden.

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This method can be beautifully semantic as it may not require an additional elements. However if you find yourself adding a new div just to apply this, it is equally as unsemantic as the empty div method and less adaptable. Also bear in mind that the overflow property isn't specifically for clearing floats. Be careful not to hide content or trigger unwanted scrollbars." –  Jawad Sep 13 '13 at 10:28

Elements after the floating element will flow around it. You can avoid this by using the clear property.

So right after your div having class stuff, add this:

<div style="clear:both"></div>

See your example on jsfiddle here

share|improve this answer
3  
There is no need to add unneeded elements when you can just use overflow: auto; –  Xarcell Sep 12 '13 at 22:48
1  
@Xarcell: And does not the overflow: auto has its own issues? –  Jawad Sep 12 '13 at 22:50
    
@Jawad No it doesn't, not unless you don't know how to add widths & margins properly. If you use overflow:hidden and your calculations are off, you won't notice it unless the content is severely cut off, with overflow: auto you would know right away that your calculations are off because you end up with scrollbars. –  Xarcell Sep 12 '13 at 22:52
    
@Xarcell: LOL. Go do some digging mate. Too tired to find it up for you. –  Jawad Sep 12 '13 at 22:54
2  
The problem is that adding an additional element, while it solves the problem, is not the "correct" way to handle float containment. It's not semantic. The use of inline styles is also a bad practice. –  thirdender Sep 12 '13 at 22:55

You need to use the clearfix hack to fix this. Try this code instead:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Learning CSS</title>

<style>
    .content 
    {
        border: #000000 solid 3px;
        clear: left;
        padding: 1em;
        zoom: 1;
    }

    .stuff
    {
        float: left;
    }

    .content:before, .content:after
    {
        content: "";
        display: table;
    } 

    .content:after
    {
        clear: both;
    }

</style>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Learning CSS</h1>
<div class="content">
    <h2>Page 1</h2>
    <p>Text...</p>
    <div class="stuff">
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
        <p>Text...</p>
    </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

To have a float expand the border of the container it is in you will need to apply what is called a clearfix to the container. There are probably a dozen different ways to do this, so instead of giving you one, I'll refer you to an excellent question whose answers list several: Which method of ‘clearfix’ is best?

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